Sociology, Social Work, & Criminal Justice

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About the Program

The Department of Sociology, Social Work and Criminal Justice offers a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology; Bachelors of Science in Social Work; and Bachelors of Science in Criminal Justice and three minors in Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice. Students may choose to pursue Sociology; Social Work; or Criminal Justice with a minor in either Sociology, Social Work, or Criminal Justice.

The Sociology major emphasizes developing in students the knowledge and skills necessary to think critically and imaginatively about social issues and to promote social betterment.

As students work towards their degree, they will find that sociology is much more than an academic discipline. In fact, sociology offers students an exciting new way of seeing the social world they live in. Students can expect sociology to enrich their personal life, as well as prepare their way for a deeply satisfying professional life.

Goals of the major include the acquisition of knowledge about human diversity, social inequality, and the pursuit of social justice.

The major and its programs prepare students for various professional roles in Human Services and Criminal Justice, and provide the educational background necessary for students to pursue graduate studies in criminology/criminal justice, law, social work, counseling, policy development, research, and other related disciplines.

Since all human behavior is social and the scope of sociology respectively broad, career prospects for majors are (and will remain) quite excellent at both entry and advanced levels.

Are you interested in...

  • Studying social behavior and society
  • Analyzing how social influences affect different individuals
  • Designing research projects
  • Helping to formulate public policy and resolve social problems

Choose Sociology at ESU

  • Interactive classroom environments
  • Practical field experiences
  • Qualified, experienced faculty
  • Frequent faculty interactions

Is sociology a career path for me?

Career Potential

  • Sociologist
  • Case Worker
  • Criminal Justice Professional
  • Manager
  • Social Researcher
  • Government Agency Professional

Career Settings

  • Human Services Agencies
  • Criminal Justice Agencies
  • Business
  • Education
  • Government
  • Community Relations

More detailed career information is available from the department.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

  • Program Features

    33 Semester Hours

    • Required major courses: SOC 111, 254, 255, 312, 370, and 495; 15 additional semester hours.
    • Other requirements:
    • Minimum quality point average of 2.5 in major at time of graduation
    • Minimum of "C" in all required courses
    • 21 semester credits in Sociology must be earned at ESU including SOC 254, 255, 312, 370, and 495.
    • Please see the university requirements in the Undergraduate Catalog.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      SOC 111: Introduction to Sociology

      3

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      Sociology Electives (100 or 200 level)

      3

      CMST 111: Speech Communication

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      SOC 254: Quantitative Approaches in Sociology or

      SOC 255: Sociological Inquiry

      3

      Sociology Elective

      3

      Free Electives

      3 to 6

      General Education Electives

      6 to 12

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      SOC 254: Quantitative Approaches in Sociology or

      SOC 255: Sociological Inquiry

      3

      Sociology Elective

      3

      Electives

      3 to 6

      General Education Electives

      6 to 12

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      SOC 312: Research Methods or SOC 370: Sociological Theory

      3

      Sociology Elective (300/400 level)

      3

      Free Electives

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      SOC 312: Research Methods or SOC 370: Sociological Theory

      3

      Sociology Elective (300/400 level)

      3

      Free Electives

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Senior Year

      Fall

      SOC 495: Seminar

      3

      Free Electives

      12

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      Or SOC 495: Seminar

      3

      Free Electives

      12

      Subtotal

      15

      Total Credits

      120

      *Criminal Justice and Social Work students complete required concentration electives.

      For more information, contact the department by calling 570-422-3453 or visit Stroud Hall, Room 414 570-422-3453 www.esu.edu/soc

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Spanish

  • The Faculty of Social Sciences

    Coordinating departments:

    Foreign Languages and Sociology-Anthropology.

    This degree program prepares students for careers in social work, criminal justice and related fields in urban areas with large Spanish-speaking populations.

    54 semester hours

Minor in Sociology

Minor in Criminal Justice

  • 24 semester hours

    The goal of the Criminal Justice Administration program is to provide students with the educational background necessary to pursue careers in Criminal Justice, and/or to pursue graduate study in criminology, criminal justice, law, or other related fields.

    Transfer Policy:

    1. No upper level (300 and 400 level) courses will be accepted from community or junior colleges for the Criminal Justice major or minor.
    2. For Criminal Justice minor - a minimum of 15 credits must be taken at East Stroudsburg, and 300 and 400 level courses from four-year colleges are accepted only with permission of the department.

Minor in Social Work

  • 24 Semester Hours

    The goal of the Social Work program is to provide students the educational background necessary for competent generalist social work practice in a range of human service settings and/or to pursue graduate study in social work or related disciplines.

Faculty

Course Descriptions

  • SOC 102 GE: Introduction to Cultural Diversity (3)

    • This course provides a cross-cultural study of all human behaviors and social arrangements in contemporary cultures. Topics surveyed include race and ethnicity; language; gender and sexuality; age and kinship roles; religion and spiritual life; marriage and the family; political and economic behavior; globalization and cultural change; and the arts. The main focus will be on the application of the anthropological perspective and methods for understanding social and cultural differences and similarities.

  • SOC 111 GE: Introduction to Sociology (3)

    • This course examines the nature of social phenomena, fields and methods of sociology, and social processes involved in the evolution of human society.

  • SOC 201 GE: The Comparison of Societies (3)

    • This class is designed to introduce students to a sociological and cross-disciplinary understanding of major ideas, institutions, and historical events that have shaped human societies. Selected societies in Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Latin America and Europe will be studied. The class will focus on various social and cultural issues, such as family and religion, racial and gender relations, deviance, immigration, and social stratification systems. To facilitate cross-cultural understanding and awareness, students will be asked to read broadly on subjects relating to the lives of people from different societies and to reflect on their own experience. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 231 GE: Marriage and Family (3)

    • This course examines the "family" in its various forms. Special attention will be placed on an analysis of the family as an ideological construct that upholds lines of difference according to race, class, gender, and sexual identity. Family change is studied throughout the course, including shifts in patterns of dating and courtship, cohabitation, the division of both paid and unpaid labor, divorce and blended families.

  • SOC 241 GE: Contemporary Social Problems (3)

    • This course introduces students to the sociological study of social problems facing contemporary American society. It explores the social, political, and cultural causes, consequences, and possible solutions to social problems related to health care, crime, poverty, and inequality based on social class, racial and ethnic background, gender, and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 254 Quantitative Approaches in Sociology (3)

    • This course is a survey of the quantitative approaches for students in sociology. This course is designed to introduce the basics of the quantitative approaches in sociology to students majoring in sociology. The main emphasis will be on the applications of the quantitative methods and the interpretation of results in sociological reports and writings. Students will learn the logic and the applications of the quantitative methods of data analysis that are commonly utilized in sociology. Potential strengths and weaknesses of various quantitative methods of data analysis in sociological research will be discussed. Prerequisite: SOC 111 (with a grade of C or better)

  • SOC 255 Sociological Inquiry (3)

    • This course will familiarize students with the sociological perspective, the history of sociology, and major contemporary sociological paradigms and their historical roots. We will examine the role sociology plays in the larger society, consider the theories and research methods used by sociologists, and develop skills needed for a rewarding academic career as a major in our department. The course is also designed to help students sharpen their analytic and critical thinking skills as well as become more effective writers, listeners, and participants in the sociologically examined life. Prerequisite: SOC 111 (with a grade of C or better)

  • SOC 265 GE: Culture and Society in the Middle East (3)

    • This course provides the sociological perspectives on cultural practices and social institutions of the Middle Eastern societies. This course will discuss the regional and global forces that have shaped the Middle Eastern societies and cultures. More specifically, this course will cover topics such as the role of colonialism, religion, ethnicity, gender roles and family in the Middle East.

  • SOC 280 GE: Sociological Perspectives in Globalization (3)

    • This course examines globalization and its impact on societies, cultures, social groups, communities and the everyday life of individuals. It applies sociological perspectives to study globalization and its impact on issues such as workers and global migration, the livelihood of indigenous people, the role & status of women, food production and hunger, the spread and treatment of disease, and the depletion of environment. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 290 Special Topics (Semester hours arranged)

    • These courses are designed to meet specific needs of groups of students or are offered on a trial basis in order to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the university curriculum.

  • SOC 302 Social Inequality, Crime and Justice (3)

    • This course will utilize a structural and interactional approach to understanding notions of power that produce and reinforce inequality in the American criminal justice system. The course will primarily examine inequality as it pertains to race, class, gender, age and sexual orientation within this social institution. Prerequisites: SOC 111, SOCJ 150, 1 additional 200-300 level criminal justice or sociology course.

  • SOC 310 GE: Introduction to Social Welfare Policy & Services (3)

    • This course is designed to provide an overview of U.S. social welfare policy and service delivery. Major social welfare policies and programs will be highlighted and policy practice skills including the analysis of social welfare policy emphasized. Students will critically analyze the adequacy of various social welfare policies and programs. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 311 Introduction to Social Work (3)

    • This course is intended for students interested in social work and other helping professions to become familiar with theory and practice in the three major social work fields (casework, group work, and community organizations), to gain some insight into social work research, supervision, and social policy making, to study the generic principles common to the major fields of practice (i.e., suitable for a variety of situations calling for intervention with individuals, groups, and communities), and to explore employment opportunities. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 312 Research Methods (3)

    • This course examines procedures for planning, organizing, and conducting qualitative and quantitative sociological research projects. Students will acquire the skills to implement research using a variety of methodologies, including surveys, interviews, and ethnographic field research. Prerequisites: SOC 111, 254.

  • SOC 331 Human Behavior and the Social Environment (3)

    • This course examines development throughout the life course. The social systems in which human development unfolds will be emphasized in the course as will the manner in which these can impair or foster health, happiness, and optimal adjustment across the life course. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 333 Chinese Culture and Society (3)

    • This course introduces students to the cultural practices, social institutions and social changes in Chinese society. Students will engage in a sociological analysis to understand the social, political and economic forces that shape the lives of individuals in Chinese society. More specifically, the course examines topics such as the impact of population policy on family, ethnic relations and conflicts, rural-urban migration, gender norms, political and economic developments and resistance movements.

      Prerequisite: SOC 111 and either SOC 201 or SOC 280.

  • SOC 338 The Sociology of Poverty and Homelessness (3)

    • This course focuses on helping students develop an understanding of the dimensions of poverty and homelessness in the United States and explores the implications for distributive justice. Students will assess the effectiveness of the social policies and programs created to combat poverty and homelessness and participate in course-based service-learning and social action projects. Prerequisite: SOC 111 and 310.

  • SOC 341 GE: Criminology (3)

    • This course is an examination of theories of crime causation, demographic characteristics of criminals, the history of theories of punishment, and modern reformative and rehabilitative methods. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 342 GE: Juvenile Delinquency (3)

    • This course is a study of the delinquent as a person and juvenile delinquency as a social problem and theories of delinquent causation, methods of correctional treatment and community preventive projects will be systematically studied. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 343 GE: Racial and Cultural Minorities (3)

    • This course examines dominant-minority relations in the U.S. Special emphasis will be placed on how social, economic, and political power and privilege help create and perpetuate prejudice and discrimination. As America becomes more racially and culturally diverse, we need to make a greater effort to understand, respect, and benefit from the diversity around us. This course is intended to help students discover these benefits as well as deal with the challenges that go hand in hand with an increasingly multicultural society. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 344 Social Deviance (3)

    • This course will explore how and why certain acts come to be defined as deviant. Students will examine how deviance is defined, how the "actors" are maintained, and how violators of the definitions are processed and treated. A historical analysis of political processes that inform the evolution, modification, and enforcement of "deviant" categories will be discussed through the lens of various sociological perspectives. Prerequisites: 6 credits in SOC including SOC 111.

  • SOC 345 Sociology of Sexuality (3)

    • This course will examine individual and societal perceptions of, practices toward, and reactions to sexuality. Social context and power, especially as they pertain to issues of gender, race and sexual orientation, will be examined as they affect sexual identity and expressions of sexuality. The relative influence of physiology and learning processes will be explored as well. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 370 Sociological Theory (3)

    • This course is designed to give the student an overview of sociological theory. Students will be introduced to a wide range of theories and theoretical orientations and the major theorists associated with them. The course covers both classical and contemporary sociological theory. Special emphasis is placed on the strengths and weaknesses of each approach and the link between theory and substantive research. Prerequisites: SOC 111, 255.

  • SOC 372 Sociology of Religion (3)

    • This course explores religion in its varied manifestations as a social institution, as a cultural practice, and as a pattern of beliefs and practices that are shaped by and, in turn, shape societal conditions. Emphasis is placed on the role of religion in the public arena (political, the economical, and popular media), religious pluralism and conflict, the impact of race, gender, and social class on religion and the ongoing debate over the appropriate role of religion in social life. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 374 Political Sociology (3)

    • This course is the study of the social causes and consequences of given power distributions within or between societies and of the conflicts that lead to changes in the allocation of this power. The social backgrounds of extremist movements and of the "True Believers" that join them will be analyzed. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 377 GE: WS: Sociology of Women (3)

    • This course is specially designed to afford the student and/or professional person an open and non-threatening opportunity to examine both societal and personal sex role stereotyping and the attendant societal mechanisms by which these roles are mandated and enforced. A brief survey of women in society will be followed by an in-depth look at the women's movement and institutional change. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 378 GE: American Community (3)

    • This course examines the nature, structure, and functions of the community. It includes a study of the inter-relations of major institutions in the community; attention is directed to the city, the small town, and the rural community. Prerequisite: SOC 111.

  • SOC 485 Independent Study (Semester hours arranged)

    • This course consists of directed research and study on an individual basis. The student wishing independent study must contact a member of the Department of Sociology who is willing to supervise the study. The student's request for independent study must then be approved by the members of the Department. A minimum of five (5) hours per credit of exclusive time with the supervising faculty member will be made available to the student. Prerequisite: Advanced standing of 90 credits.

  • SOC 486 Field Work and Observation (Semester hours arranged)

    • This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to obtain practical experience with an agency in the community. Supervision will be given by both the community agency and the instructor. A weekly seminar class will be held with the instructor to discuss the experience. Prerequisites: Advanced standing of 90 credits, arrangements with and consent of instructor before registration.

  • SOC 487 and 488 Foreign Travel I and II (3), (3)

    • This course consists of a study trip to observe at first hand the metamorphosis of postwar Europe, a study of the history and governmental systems of Western European countries, their economic growth and integration through the common market, investigation of the social environment on a formal and informal basis, and a general study of Western Europe in the post-war world. Prerequisites: Advanced standing of 90 credits, consent of the chair of the department.

  • SOC 490 Social Implications of Computers (3)

    • This course presents concepts on how computers impact our lives and our society. It provides a framework for professional activity that involves explicit consideration of the social impacts of computers and presents tools and techniques which are applicable to the problems posed by the social implications of computers. Prerequisites: CPSC 111, 112, 231, 251.

  • SOC 495 Seminar (3)

    • This course consists of discussion and intensive study of selected topics, issues, problems, sociological writings, and investigations. Prerequisites: Advanced standing in Sociology, consent of instructor, SOC 111, 21 additional SOC credits including SOC 312 and 370.

  • Criminal Justice Courses

    • SOCJ 150 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
      • This course is an overview of the role of police, prosecution, court, and correctional processes in the administration of criminal justice in the United States. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. It will not count toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 151 Introduction to Security (3)
      • This course discusses the history, nature, and scope of private security in modern society, the basic principles of physical security, internal loss prevention, defensive systems, fire prevention and safety, and the security function in the corporate structure. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. It will not count toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 250 Corrections (3)
      • The correctional process (sentencing, incarceration, and release) will be examined. Prison classification, treatment systems, life "inside," discipline, inmates' rights, and parole prediction are studied. The course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration program. It will not count toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 251 Police Organization and Administration (3)
      • This course is an examination of the historical development and present organization and administration of police departments and a consideration of the principles of organization best adapted to ensure effective service to the community. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 252 Organized Crime (3)
      • The history, growth, structure, philosophy, and scope of Organized Crime will be studied. Effective methods of prosecuting this type of crime will be reviewed. The course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration program. It will not count toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 253 Violence in Society (3)
      • This course is an in-depth study of violence, with topics such as riots, campus and civil disorders, violent crime, terrorism, and assassinations discussed in detail to give the student an insight into this deviant behavior. The course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. It will not count toward the Sociology major.

    • SOCJ 302 Social Inequality, Crime and Justice (3)
      • This course will utilize a structural and interactional approach to understanding notions of power that produce and reinforce inequality in the American criminal justice system. The course will primarily examine inequality as it pertains to race, class, gender, age and sexual orientation within this social institution. Pre-requisite(s): SOC 111, SOCJ 150, 1 additional 200-300 level criminal justice or sociology course.

    • SOCJ 350 The Criminal Process (3)
      • This course provides an overview of the criminal process from arrest through trial and sentencing. It includes discussions of the law and procedures applicable at each stage, including classification of crimes, warrants, searches and seizures, confessions, evidence, preservation, preliminary hearings, motions, pleas, and trials. Particular crimes are treated substantively as necessary to supply examples. Practical exercises are contemplated. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOCJ 150.

    • SOCJ 351 Police Investigation (3)
      • This course considers appropriate conduct at the crime scene, techniques of interview, interrogation of witnesses and suspects, the uses of informants, studies of specific investigative methods for particular kinds of cases, and the presentation of police cases in court. The course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. It will not count toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOCJ 150.

    • SOCJ 352 Police and Community Relations (3)
      • This course is a review of the problems confronting the police and the community, a study of minorities to gain an understanding of their particular problems, an in-depth look at ways of achieving trust, understanding, respect, and cooperation from the public that the police serve. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOCJ 150.

    • SOCJ 353 Crisis Management in Law Enforcement (3)
      • This course will introduce students to the current issues of managing critical incidents and hostage situations that occur in law enforcement and corrections. It will focus on those activities necessary to stabilize life and property threatening incidents. It will provide an understanding of commanding high-risk incidents, pre-incident planning, and critical incident stress reactions. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or SOCJ 150.

    • SOCJ 354 Drug Use and Abuse in Society (3)
      • This course will focus on drug use and abuse as it pertains to today's society. It will offer an in-depth look into the various types of drugs and how they affect the body along with the implications that arise through the abuse of these substances. It will explore the concept of addiction to the various controlled substances that are available pharmaceutically and on the black market. Stimulants, depressants, and hallucinogens will be discussed in-depth, along with the various State and Federal Laws that apply to the Controlled Substance Acts. Lastly it will look at alcohol use and abuse, over the counter medications, and the emerging trends of drug use that are ever changing in our society. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology Major. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or SOCJ 150.

    • SOCJ 460 Schools, Gangs, Violence and Society (3)
      • This course will examine the various aspects of violence as they relate to the school setting. It will take an in-depth look at gangs, weapons, and drugs in the school environment. This course will discuss some of the more recent approaches from law enforcement perspective that have worked in combating school violence. This course is offered in cooperation with the Criminal Justice Administration Program. The course will not apply toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOC 111 or SOCJ 150, and a second course in Sociology.

    • SOCJ 475 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)
      • Ethical decision-making is a central component of professional integrity. This course will introduce students to professional ethics in criminal justice, to the ethical dilemmas encountered by criminal justice professionals, and to the processes of making ethical decisions in criminal justice settings. Topics to be examined include police discretion and excessive force, racial profiling, prosecutorial misconduct, investigatory deception, and corruption. Prerequisite: SOCJ 150, 350, and either SOCJ 250 or 352.

  • Course Descriptions

    • SOSW 140 Foundations of Social Work Practice (3)
      • This course is designed to introduce students with social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities as applicable to various social work fields of practice. It also introduces students to the historical foundations, contemporary knowledge base, core values, and ethical principles of the social work profession.

    • SOSW 220 Contemporary Social Work Practice (3)
      • This course is designed to focus on contemporary issues and approaches in social work practice, and the responsibilities and ethics of a professional social worker. The course will also introduce students to the basic skills of helping. A limited field experience will enhance the classroom content and provide a venue for students to explore contemporary practice in a field of social work that interests them.

    • SOSW 321 Helping Philosophies and Methods for Social Workers (3)
      • This course provides an introduction to the main modern therapies that professional social workers can use with their clients or take into consideration in making referrals. The main assumptions, concepts, and methods of dynamic psychotherapy, behavior therapy, and humanistic psychotherapy will be analyzed and illustrated. Prerequisite: SOSW 140. This course will not count for the Sociology major.

    • SOSW 325 Crisis Intervention (3)
      • This course will introduce students to the theoretical knowledge and practice skills necessary to competently intervene as crisis counselors in selected crisis situations. This course does not count for the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOC 311 or permission of instructor.

    • SOSW 326 Child Welfare Services (3)
      • This is a social welfare policy course providing a comprehensive study of principal child welfare policy and services. Supportive, supplementary, protective, substitute services will be covered with a special focus on the problem of child abuse and neglect. Emphasis will be on child welfare services as a field of social work practice. This course will not count toward the Sociology major. Prerequisite: SOSW 140.

    • SOSW 371 Social Work with Individuals & Families (3)
      • This course provides the foundation for social work practice with individuals and families. It emphasizes the basic knowledge, analytic and practice skills, and values necessary for direct practice. Students will learn how to engage/join with individuals and families. Specific knowledge to assist students in both assessment and establishing goals for intervention will be covered. Pre-requisite(s): SOSW 140

    • SOSW 372 Social Work with Groups (3)
      • The focus of this course is small group theory and practice as applicable to social work practice. Social work intervention with family groups, problem-centered groups, and social action focused groups will be examined. Focus will be both on developing understanding of group dynamics and group process, and developing skills in group work practice. Prerequisite: SOSW 140 and SOSW 371.

    • SOSW 373 Social Work with Communities and Organizations (3)
      • This course focuses on developing knowledge and skills appropriate for social work practice with communities and organizations. The course designed to teach skills to influence the organizational context of practice, as well as community organizing and program development skills. Pre-requisite(s): SOSW 140, SOSW 371.

    • SOSW 483 Social Work Practice and Skills I (6)
      • This course is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and skills in the professional practice of social work through an integrated class and agency-based learning experience. Major theories related to professional practice will be examined and skills in assessment, planning intervention, and evaluation will be developed. Emphasis is placed on the development of an increased understanding of the use of self in the professional social work role. This course will not count toward the sociology major. Pre-requisite(s): SOSW 140, 371, 372, 373.

    • SOSW 484 Social Work Practice and Skills II (6)
      • This course is the second semester long experience designed to provide students with an advanced opportunity to apply in-depth social work knowledge, skills, values and ethics through an integrated class and agency-based learning experience. Students will complete a capstone project related to their agency-based experience. Students must receive a minimum of a C in SOSW 483 to be able to register for the course. This course will not count toward the sociology major. Pre-requisite(s): SOSW 140, SOC 310, 311, SOSW 371, 372, 373, 483.