Psychology

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College of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Science

Stroud Hall, Room 114A

570-422-3355......www.esu.edu/psy

About the Programs

ESU offers both a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology degree and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree. Both programs prepare students for graduate study in Psychology.

The Bachelor of Arts program is generalized and flexible. In addition to providing a good foundation of basic knowledge about psychological processes, it allows students the flexibility to explore several of the diverse topics included in Psychology, or to concentrate their studies on several courses in one specific area.

The Bachelor of Science program offers three concentrations:

The Counseling concentration prepares students for occupations in the human services field and for graduate study in counseling psychology and related fields.

The Research concentration allows students to focus on the methods of the discipline, preparing for careers in behavioral research conducted by universities, businesses and government.

The Applied concentration is flexible, to enable students to either focus on a specific area within applied psychology or explore a broader base. Diverse topics include forensic, industrial/organizational and sports psychology.

Are you interested in...

  • Problem-solving
  • The mind and behavior
  • Helping people

Choose Psychology at ESU

  • Small advanced class sizes
  • Practical field experiences
  • Qualified, experienced faculty

Is Psychology a career path for me?

Career Potential

  • Counseling
  • Behavioral research
  • Graduate school preparation

Career Settings

  • Government
  • Health care
  • Business/Industry
  • Education

More detailed career information is available from the department.

Psychology Department Objectives

The objectives of the Department of Psychology are to enrich your understanding of the behavior of humans and other animals; to have you adopt a rational, objective, experiential understanding of behavioral and psychological processes; and to develop the critical thinking abilities that will permit you to distinguish between scientific and nonscientific explanations of behavior. The department adopts a biopsychosocial view, one that explains behavior as a function of both organismic and environmental conditions. You will be introduced to the current body of knowledge in psychology; its data, methods, and theoretical formulations in the principle fields.

Faculty

Professors:

Anthony Drago, Chair (tdrago@po-box.esu.edu)

Sussie Eshun (seshun@po-box.esu.edu)

Donna Hodge (dhodge@po-box.esu.edu)

Joseph Miele (jmiele@po-box.esu.edu)

Richard Wesp (rkwesp@po-box.esu.edu)

Associate Professors:

Paul Bartoli (pbartoli@po-box.esu.edu)

Renee Boburka (rboburka@po-box.esu.edu)

Bonnie Green (bgreen@po-box.esu.edu)

Jyh-Hann (John) Chang (jchang@po-box.esu.edu)

Assistant Professor:

Irina Khusid-Bromgard (ikhusid@po-box.esu.edu)

Student Organizations

Psychology Association

An organization for students who have a special interest in the fields of psychology, the association gives students the opportunity to broaden their educational experience in psychology through individual and group research and field trips. All students enrolled in a psychology curriculum or concentration, as well as other interested students, are invited to join.

Psi Chi National Honor Society

This national organization encourages, stimulates and maintains excellence in scholarship and advances the science of psychology. Membership is open to students making the study of psychology one of their major interests and who meet minimum qualifications. Membership is by invitation and based on a preliminary review of academic records. Applicants are encouraged to attend ESU chapter meetings and participate in outside activities. Near the end of each semester, applications and participation are reviewed and current members vote on the applicants.

Bachelor of Arts in Psychology

    • Required major courses: PSY 101, 201, 202, 311, 321, 410; one of 203, 302, or 401; and nine additional semester hours in Psychology.
    • Corequisite course: BIOL 111
    • Other Requirements: C or better in all Psychology courses (All Psychology used for this major). At last fifteen credits of the Psychology required for this program including all 300 and 400 level Psychology courses, must be done at East Stroudsburg University.
    • Also, please read university requirements found in this catalog.

    This degree program is generalized and flexible. In addition to providing a good foundation of basic knowledge about psychological processes, it allows students the flexibility to explore several of the diverse topics in Psychology or concentrate several courses in one specific area.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      PSY 100 GE: General Psychology

      3

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 201: Quantitative Psychology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PSY 202: Experimental Psychology

      3

      PSY 321: Theories of Personality

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      Psychology Specialty Course

      3

      Psychology Specialty Course

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Corequisite (BIOL 105, 111 or 114 or CHEM 115)

      3

      Upper Division Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Upper Division Elective

      3

      Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      14

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PSY 311: Physiological Psychology

      4

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PSY 410: Perspectives in Psychology

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      12

      Total Credits

      120

Bachelor of Science in Psychology - Concentration: Applied Psychology

    • Required major courses: PSY 100 or 101; 201, 202, 241, 321, and any three additional non-general education psychology courses (any three except PSY 220, 222, 225). Select one course from each of the two groups:
    • Biological based: PSY 301, 311, 312, or 326.
    • Socio-cultural: PSY 292, 294, 305, 306, or 320
    • Required Integrative course: Select 9 credits from the following: PSY 401, 409, 410, 461, 452, or 486.
    • Each course within the major can only be counted for one requirement.
    • All of the 300 and 400 level Psychology courses required for this program must be taken at East Stroudsburg University. No more then 15 credits in the major will be accepted for transfer.
    • All required courses must be passed with a "C" or higher.
    • Please read university requirements found in this catalog.

    A Bachelor of Science in Psychology with an Applied Concentration is intentionally designed to be flexible to enable students working with their advisers to either focus on a specific area within applied psychology or explore a broad base in psychology.

    In addition to providing a strong foundation, the Applied Concentration permits students to explore or specialize in diverse topics including forensic, industrial/organizational, and sports psychology. This concentration is well suited for students who have a dual major.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      PSY 100 GE: General Psychology

      3

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 201: Quantitative Psychology

      3

      PSY 321: Theories of Personality

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PSY 241: Measurement and Evaluation

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 202: Experimental Psychology

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Junior Year

      Fall

      Psychology - Biological Based

      4

      Psychology Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      Psychology – Socio-cultural Based

      3

      Psychology Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PSY 410: Perspectives in Psychology

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PSY 409: Research in Psychology

      3

      PSY 486: Field Experience

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Total Credits

      120

Bachelor of Science in Psychology - Concentration: Counseling

    • Required major courses: PSY 100 or 101; 201, 202, 241, 321, 351, 451, and any one additional non-general education psychology course (any three except PSY 220, 222, 225). Select one course from each of the two groups:
    • Biological based: PSY 301, 311, 312, or 326.
    • Socio-cultural: PSY 292, 294, 305, 306, or 320
    • Required Integrative course: PSY 461, 452, and 484.
    • Each course within the major can only be counted for one requirement.
    • All of the 300 and 400 level Psychology courses required for this program must be taken at East Stroudsburg University. No more then 15 credits in the major will be accepted for transfer.
    • All required courses must be passed with a "C" or higher.
    • Please read university requirements found in this catalog.

    A Bachelor of Science in Psychology with a Counseling Concentration prepares students for occupations in the human services field and for graduate study in counseling psychology and related fields. The unique skill set developed is an excellent preparation for graduate school and for entry level careers in government agencies, private and public healthcare settings, business and industry, and educational settings.

    A wide variety of career opportunities are available under the direct supervision of licensed professionals such as psychologists, psychiatrists, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      PSY 100 GE: General Psychology

      3

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 201: Quantitative Psychology

      3

      PSY 321: Theories of Personality

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PSY 241: Measurement and Evaluation

      3

      PSY 351: Abnormal Psychology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 202: Experimental Psychology

      3

      Psychology – Socio-cultural Based

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Junior Year

      Fall

      PSY 451: Introduction to Counseling

      3

      Psychology – Biological Based

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PSY 452: Group Processes

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      4

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PSY 461: Test and Measures

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PSY 484: Mental Health Practice

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Subtotal

      12

      Total Credits

      120

Bachelor of Science in Psychology - Concentration: Research

  • Select one course from each of the following groups:

    • Socio-cultural: PSY 292, 294, 305, 306, or 320
    • Lab course: PSY 301, 304, 311, 313, or 402
    • Required Integrative course: PSY 401, 409, and 410.
    • Each course within the major can only be counted for one requirement.
    • All of the 300 and 400 level Psychology courses required for this program must be taken at East Stroudsburg University. No more then 15 credits in the major will be accepted for transfer.
    • All required courses must be passed with a "C" or higher.
    • Please read university requirements found in this catalog.

    A Bachelor of Science in Psychology with a Research Concentration allows students to focus on the scientific theories and methods of psychology. The Research Concentration enables students to prepare for graduate school and careers in psychological research conducted by universities, businesses, and government. Students work with their advisers when deciding which courses best meet their educational and professional goals.

    The department will accept a maximum of 15 transfer credits in the major only if the credits were earned within eight years prior to admission to ESU. No credits can be transferred into the major as equivalents of junior-senior level courses.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      PSY 100 GE: General Psychology

      3

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 201: Quantitative Psychology

      3

      PSY 321: Theories of Personality

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PSY 241: Measurement and Evaluation

      3

      Psychology Socio-cultural Based

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PSY 202: Experimental Psychology

      3

      Psychology – Biological Based

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Fitness Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Junior Year

      Fall

      Psychology - Biological Based

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      1

      PSY 401: History of Psychology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      13

      Spring

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PSY 410: Perspectives in Psychology

      3

      Psychology – Integrative Course

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PSY 409: Research in Psychology

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Psychology or Upper Division Electives

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Total Credits

      120

Psychology Minor

  • This program is designed for majors in related disciplines who desire to complement their academic studies and/or career preparation with extended study of psychology. Course selections shall be made in conjunction with a psychology faculty member's consultation and approval.

    At least one half of the credit hours required for this program must be completed at East Stroudsburg University. In order to receive a minor in psychology, a student must receive a grade of "A," "B" or "C" in all courses which count as part of the minor.

Course Descriptions

  • PSY 100 GE: General Psychology (3)

    • This course includes an introduction to the science of behavior and mental life, a bio-social view of man and other animals, and a survey of its methods, theories, history, and knowledge of the role of organismic, environmental, and social factors in behavioral and psychological processes.

  • PSY 101 GE: Introduction to Psychology (3)

    • This course provides the student with an understanding of contemporary psychological concepts, theories, methods, issues, and problems in the context of the classic questions of psychology. This course is designed primarily for students majoring in Psychology and closely related fields of study.

  • PSY 105 GE: Infant and Early Childhood Developmental Psychology (3)

    • This class will introduce students to historical and contemporary theories and models in child developmental psychology. Central to this course will be the application of these theories to maximize healthy development in infants and children.

  • PSY 201 Quantitative Psychology (3)

    • This course will cover standard quantitative methods in psychology used for understanding mental processes and behavior. This will include an introduction to research and measurement issues as they relate to psychology. Students will also learn how to select, calculate, and interpret appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics for the understanding of psychological phenomenon. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 202 Experimental Psychology (3)

    • This course is an introduction to the philosophy and research methods of behavioral science with particular emphasis upon the experimental method, experimental analysis, and research of traditional and contemporary issues. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201.

  • PSY 203 Psychology of Motivation (3)

    • This course is an introduction to the psychological literature concerning motivation as viewed through major theoretical systems. There will be an examination of the motivational forces underlying human and animal behavior. Basic motivational concepts will be surveyed with an attempt to represent various areas of motivational research. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 220 GE: Social Psychology (3)

    • This course provides an introductory survey of the field of social psychology. Group processes, interpersonal attraction, attitude theory, persuasion, prejudice, aggression, conflict, and helping behaviors are among the topics considered. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 222 GE: Psychology of Adjustment (3)

    • This course is a functional approach to the problem of how humans acquire their distinctive ways of adjusting, favorably or unfavorably, to the total environment. It includes adjustment as a biosocial process, varieties of adjustive behavior, personality, and types of therapy and applications. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 225 GE: Lifespan Developmental Psychology (3)

    • Lifespan developmental psychology is the study of how and why people change over time as well as how and why they remain the same from conception through old age. More specifically this course takes an interdisciplinary look at development from the social science fields of anthropology, sociology, and psychology and from the natural science discipline of biology. This broader approach provides insights into three areas of development: the physical domain, the cognitive domain, and the psychosocial domain. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 231 Industrial Psychology (3)

    • This course deals with psychological information and theories applied to business and industrial settings. Focus is upon leadership, motivation, training, and personnel selection and placement. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101 and PSY 201.

  • PSY 241 Measurement and Evaluation in Psychology (3)

    • This course covers a brief history of testing and assessment. The focus is on basic procedures necessary for the quantification of measured characteristics and includes a study of norms reliability and validity in the development of standardized tests. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201.

  • PSY 250 Fundamentals of Psychology (3)

    • This course will provide a necessary foundation for students majoring in psychology. This foundation will include an overview of basic history, methods of communication, and careers in psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101, prerequisite or concurrently PSY 201.

  • PSY 251 Psychological Disorders (3)

    • This course is designed to introduce students to the major classification of psychological disorders in accordance with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual. The course will emphasize the symptomatology and prevailing treatment modalities that are characterized with each disorder. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 271 CJA: Forensic Psychology (3)

    • This course introduces the student to the relationship between the field of psychology and the criminal justice system in the U.S. The approach is interdisciplinary in nature and intended for those interested in social science, behavioral science, law, and criminal justice, as well as practitioners in the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 290 Special Topics (Semester hours arranged)

    • These courses are designed to meet the specific needs of groups of students and are offered on a trial basis in order to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the university curriculum.

  • PSY 291 Human Sexual Behavior (3)

    • This course examines the role of sexual behavior and attitudes in interpersonal relations, and individual psychodynamics in the attainment of full human potential. It includes an analysis of atypical sexual behavior from psychoanalytic, humanistic, social, cognitive and behavioristic viewpoints; Psychotherapy of/and human sexual dysfunction. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 292 Psychology of Women (3)

    • This course will focus on critical research issues concerning the female experience from birth to old age. It will examine the changing roles of women in contemporary society in addition to myths and stereotypes concerning women. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 294 Psychology of Minority Groups (3)

    • A study of the historical, developmental, cultural, and environmental influences on the attitudes, behavior and psychological processes of major minority groups in America. Specific groups to be highlighted in this course include: Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Latin Americans, Women, and Individuals With Disabilities. Specific topics to be discussed are: sexual preferences, the nature of prejudice, discrimination, and oppression. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 301 Sensation and Perception (3)

    • This course is a study of the structure and function of receptor systems, their role in phenomenological experience and perception, and how such systems contribute to human's orientation in and knowledge of the environment. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

  • PSY 302 Theories of Learning (3)

    • This course is a survey and critical analysis of theoretical formulations of learning processes, and their implications in child rearing, education and the mental health setting. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

  • PSY 304 Empirical Foundations of Learning (4)

    • The course offers an upper level analysis, discussion, and laboratory experiences concerning classical and contemporary issues and topics in learning and behavior control. Operant vs. respondent conditioning, biofeedback, verbal learning, motor skills learning, learning vs. performances, trial and error vs. insight, reinforcement vs. feedback, punishment and aversive control, memory, and knowledge are considered. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101 and 201.

  • PSY 305 Cross-Cultural Psychology (3)

    • This course focuses on cross-cultural applicability of psychological principles. Emphasis will be made on identifying similarities and differences in human behavior across cultures around the world. Approaches to cross-cultural research in psychology and psychological effects of acculturation, ethnocentricism, culture shock, and cultural-relativism will be explored. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101 and any 200 level psychology course.

  • PSY 306 A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Behavioral Therapy (3)

    • This course is designed to examine the influences of culture on psychological problems, interpretation of the problems, and therapy used to address the problems. Students will learn basic principles of behavior therapy, and then observe and apply these principles. Students will study major theories of cross-cultural psychology and consider the impact of culture on behavior and use those frameworks to actively compare the differences in cultures as they relate to attitudes and practices related to therapy. Prerequisites: PSY 321 and completion of at least 12 credit hours in Psychology.

  • PSY 311 Physiological Psychology (4)

    • This course is a study of the relations of behavior of organisms to their physiological processes. In addition to the characteristic modes of functioning and the complexity of the human nervous system, it includes a study of how such diverse events as ontogenetic development, brain lesions, stress, and sensory deprivation or enrichment affect behavior. A series of laboratory exercises is employed in order to aid the student in developing a more thorough understanding of the field. Prerequisite: PSY 101.

  • PSY 312 Clinical Psychopharamacology (3)

    • This course is designed to provide fundamental knowledge of how medications are used to treat a variety of psychological disorders and some neurodegenerative diseases. Emphasis is placed on how therapeutic drugs act within the nervous system, clinical studies examining the efficacy of these drugs, how these drugs are used in combination with psychotherapy, and the potential side effects of these drugs. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101, 321, 351; BIOL 111.

  • PSY 313 Comparative Psychology (4)

    • This course offers analysis, discussion, and laboratory experiences in animal and human behavior. It places human behavior in phylogenetic perspective. The behaviors of various animals are studied with emphasis on the behavioral similarities and differences among animals and with respect to humans to gain an understanding of their behavioral roots and capacities. Laboratory exercises will consist of behavioral observations and follow-up reports of animal behaviors in semi-natural and laboratory environments. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101 and 201.

  • PSY 320 Social Psychology: Theories, Research and Application (3)

    • This is designed to provide an in-depth examination of selected areas within social psychology. Topics may include conformity, social cognition, persuasion, self-justification, human aggression, interpersonal relationships, and prejudice. Emphasis is placed on the understanding, development, and application of social psychological research. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101 or 220 and PSY 201.

  • PSY 321 Theories of Personality (3)

    • This course focuses on a discussion of theories that have contributed significantly to current concepts of personality with emphasis on the diversity of views and techniques (from psychoanalysis to cognitive behaviorism) that characterize the field. The relationship of personality theory to assumptions about the nature of man will be noted. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or 101.

  • PSY 326 Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (3)

    • This course focuses on the relationship between psychology and the field of Behavioral Medicine. It involves an in-depth study of how psychological factors influence physical illness, and how to prevent these illnesses from a psychological perspective. Specifically, the course considers the process of lessening the course of certain physical illnesses by applying behavioral, cognitive, and social psychological principles. Seeking health care and adhering to medical advice will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101, and PSY 321.

  • PSY 351 Abnormal Psychology (3)

    • This course reviews basic principles of motivation, learning, and development as they are related to disorganized behavior, physiological, sociological, and psychological factors in the development of disorganized personalities, the etiology and symptomatology of the major categories of neurosis, psychosis, personality disorders, and organic brain disorders, and methods of treatment and prevention. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 321.

  • PSY 361 Child Psychopathology (3)

    • The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic concepts of Child Psychopathology, the scientific and scholarly study of child and adolescent emotional and behavioral disorders. The course will include a discussion of the etiology, symptomotology, treatment, and prevention of childhood disorders. The distinctions between child and adult pathology and current research trends will also be emphasized. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101, 321, and 351.

  • PSY 377 Psychology of Adult and Aging (3)

    • This course is designed to enhance the students understanding of various topics that are central to adult development and aging. Lectures and exercises encourage the students to apply learning to everyday life situations. Students will identify, compare and contrast, and critically evaluate major themes in the research of human development (e.g. rationalism, empiricism, maturationism, and constructivism). The course structure stresses diversity of experience and immediate practical application of the knowledge. Prerequisites: PSY 100 and one additional 3 credit psychology course.

  • PSY 401 History of Psychology (3)

    • This course considers the trends and controversial issues in psychology related to forces in a general culture and examines the philosophical and theoretical views of eminent psychologists and the influence of physical science on methodology in behavioral science. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 9 additional major credits.

  • PSY 402 Cognitive Processes (3)

    • This course is a study of complex mental processes and explanatory models of these processes, the relation between affective and associative processes, thinking, problem solving, decision-making, and creativity. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201, 202.

  • PSY 405 Infant, Child, and Adolescent Psychology (3)

    • Students will study historical and contemporary theoretical and research issues in human development. In addition to covering the challenges in developmental research and measurement design, the course will cover major systems and themes in the science of human development. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or PSY 101, 201, 241, 202 (or concurrent enrollment in PSY 202).

  • PSY 409 Research in Psychology (Semester hours arranged)

    • This course is designed to broaden a student's background in psychological topics through in-depth reading or research in a particular area. It is open to qualified students who wish to contribute an individual research project or theoretical paper under the supervision of a staff member. Subject matter varies depending upon student and faculty interest. May be repeated to a total maximum of six credits. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201, 202, 9 additional credits in psychology (18 total).

  • PSY 410 Perspectives in Psychology (3)

    • This course presents the Psychology major with an opportunity to synthesize the knowledge acquired during the undergraduate course of study. Prerequisites: PSY 100 or 101, 201, 202, permission of instructor.

  • PSY 451 Introduction to Counseling (3)

    • An overview of the field of counseling; counseling theory, techniques, and issues are discussed. Emphasis is placed on individuals and groups whose problems of choice, decision, and adjustment fall within the normal range. Educational and emotional and social counseling are examined in relation to the role of the counselor in the community. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 321, 351.

  • PSY 452 Group Processes in Counseling (3)

    • This course presents the principles and techniques of groups used in counseling. The student will survey the various group models applicable to a variety of populations and settings as well as the most recent, relevant research on group processes. The course includes didactic and experiential components. Prerequisites: Advanced standing of 90 credits, PSY 451.

  • PSY 461 Tests and Measures (3)

    • This is an advanced integrative course in the theory, problems, methods, and content of psychological testing. The course will cover basic concepts of test development, construction, administration, scoring, and interpretation. Students will work directly with Intelligence tests (e.g. Wechsler Tests), Personality Tests, (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, Sixteen Personality Factors), projective tests, and other clinical tests (e.g., Beck inventories, Mental Status exam). Prerequisites: PSY 201 and 451.

  • PSY 484 Mental Health Worker Practice and Skills (3)

    • This course is required of, and restricted to, students who are enrolled in the Mental Health Worker concentration (BS in psychology). Students are assigned to an agency appropriate to the program and their specific interests and spend a minimum of 120 hours of supervised experience in addition to meeting in a group seminar. The seminar will concentrate on day-to-day problems with which students deal in their placement and current issues and ethics in the mental health professions. (May be repeated for maximum of 12 credits.) Prerequisites: PSY 451, 452.

  • PSY 485 Independent Study (Semester hours arranged)

    • This experience is taken upon the initiative of a student who seeks to study with a knowledgeable faculty member in order to deepen a specific interest in a particular academic discipline. Independent study is a process through which a student either sharply increases his/her already advanced knowledge of a subject matter or increases his/her appreciation about an academic discipline that is correlative with the student's advanced knowledge of a subject. The proposed independent study must be submitted to the department for approval. The faculty member supervising the independent study must provide a minimum of five (5) hours of time per credit hour upon request of the student. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 60 credits, permission of instructor.

  • PSY 486 Field Experiences and Internship (Semester hours arranged)

    • This course is designed to provide students with field experience and working knowledge in the psychological area of their choosing (e.g., counseling, criminal justice, school psychology, industrial/organizational psychology). Placement may occur in a variety of locations, including hospitals, social service agencies, schools, legal firms, human resources offices, and marketing companies. A maximum of twelve credits may be earned through the program. Prerequisites: 30 credits in psychology, permission of instructor.