Physics

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College of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Science

Gessner Science Hall, Room 107

570-422-3341......www.esu.edu/physics

The Physics department offers baccalaureate degree programs in Physics, Earth and Space Science, General Science, and Secondary Education. These programs are designed to prepare students for post-graduate study and/or careers in teaching and engineering, as well as careers in other fields that require knowledge of physics and/or earth and space science. ESU's Secondary Education programs are accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Eight baccalaureate degree programs are offered: a bachelor of science in Physics; a Bachelor of Science in Physics (Secondary Education); a Bachelor of Arts in Physics; a Bachelor of Arts in Physics (Engineering Transfer Program); a Bachelor of Arts in Physical Science; a Bachelor of Arts in Earth and Space Science; a Bachelor of Science in Earth and Space Science (Secondary Education); a Bachelor of Science in General Science (Secondary Education).

The Bachelor of Arts in Physics is designed for students who seek a broad background in physics, possibly coordinated with a major in a related field. The physics coursework is similar to that required for the Bachelor of Science in Physics (secondary education), which includes 33 credits of education coursework in preparation for a career in physics teaching.

The Bachelor of Science in Physics is designed for students who wish to pursue professional or graduate work in physics or a related area.

Students in this major can choose between three tracks. The professional track provides a strong foundation for graduate work. The Industrial Physics track prepares students for careers in industry that require a strong background in physics. The first three years of the Industrial Physics track mirrors the first three years of the Engineering Transfer Program. The Earth and Space Science track provides a strong base for future study in one or more of the Earth and Space Sciences.

The course requirements and course descriptions for these three programs are listed below, followed by a suggested plan for completing the physics (secondary education) program in eight semesters.

Refer to the Earth and Space Science section of this catalog for more information on the degree programs in earth and space science and in earth and space science/secondary education.

Refer to the General Science section of this catalog for more information on the degree programs in general science and in general science/secondary education.

Refer to the Engineering Transfer Program section for more information on the cooperative engineering program with the Pennsylvania State University whereby students can transfer to an approved engineering program after completing three years at East Stroudsburg University.

Bachelor of Arts in Physics

  • Are you interested in...

    • Studying and uncovering the mysteries of the universe
    • Advancing the frontiers of scientific knowledge
    • Working with advanced laboratory equipment to achieve these goals

    Choose Physics at ESU

    • Small class sizes
    • Hands-on environment
    • Highly qualified and experienced faculty

    Is physics a career path for me?

    Career Potential

    • Physicist
    • Process Designer/Engineer
    • Systems Analyst
    • Patent Examiner

    Career Settings

    • Academia
    • Private Industry and Research Labs
    • National Labs
    • State, Local, and National Governmental Agencies

    More detailed career information is available from the department.

    Program Features

    27 Semester Hours

    • Required major courses: PHYS 161, 162, 261, 333, 361, 495; and nine additional credits in Physics 300 level or above.
    • Recommended courses: MATH 341
    • Corequisite courses: BIOL 114; CHEM 121, 123, 124, 126; MATH 140, 141, 240. One Computer Science course or its equivalent.
    • Additional requirements: At least nine credits of required courses (not corequisites), 300-level or above, must be completed at East Stroudsburg University. A minimum of a C must be obtained in all required courses.

  • Program Curriculum Plan

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      MATH 140 GE: Calculus I

      4

      CHEM 121 GE: General Chemistry I

      3

      CHEM 123 GE: General Chemistry I Laboratory

      1

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      14

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PHYS 162 GE: Physics II

      4

      PHYS 121 GE: Astronomy I

      3

      PHYS 124: Observational Astronomy Lab

      1

      MATH 240: Multivariate Calculus

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 161 GE: Physics I

      4

      CHEM 124 GE: General Chemistry II

      3

      CHEM 126 GE: General Chemistry II Laboratory

      1

      MATH 141 GE: Calculus II

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 261: Physics III

      3

      PHYS 328: Mathematical Physics

      3

      PHYS 122 GE: Astronomy II

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 361: Physics IV

      3

      PHYS 428: Theoretical Physics

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      BIOL 114 GE: Introductory Biology I

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      17

      Spring

      PHYS 333: Advanced Physics Lab I

      3

      PHYS 431: Electromagnetic Theory

      4

      PHYS 403: Optics

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 401: Quantum Physics

      3

      PHYS 495: Seminar

      1

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      13

      Spring

      PHYS 421: Statistical Physics

      3

      PHYS 441: Theoretical Mechanics

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      PHYS 123 GE: Introduction to Physical Cosmology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Total Credits

      120

Bachelor of Science in Physics

  • Are you interested in...

    • Studying and uncovering the mysteries of the universe
    • Advancing the frontiers of scientific knowledge
    • Working with advanced laboratory equipment to achieve these goals

    Choose Physics at ESU

    • Small class sizes
    • Hands-on environment
    • Highly qualified and experienced faculty

    Is physics a career path for me?

    Career Potential

    • Physicist
    • Process Designer/Engineer
    • Systems Analyst
    • Patent Examiner

    Career Settings

    • Academia
    • Private Industry and Research Labs
    • National Labs
    • State, Local, and National Governmental Agencies

    More detailed career information is available from the department.

    Earth and Science Track:

    Are you interested in...

    • Astronomy
    • Geology
    • Meteorology

    Choose Physics at ESU

    • Small class sizes
    • Hands-on environment
    • Highly qualified and experienced faculty

    Is physics a career path for me?

    Career Potential

    • Astronomer
    • Geologist
    • Meteorologist

    Career Settings

    • Academia
    • Private Industry and Research Labs
    • National Labs
    • State, Local, and National Governmental Agencies

    More detailed career information is available from the department.

    Industrial Physics Track:

    Are you interested in...

    • Figuring out how things work
    • Figuring out how to do things better
    • Figuring out the world around you
    • Building things
    • Working hard at something you think is fun or important
    • Learning about computers

    Choose Physics at ESU

    • Excellent relationship with industry
    • Small class sizes
    • Practical field experiences
    • Qualified, experienced faculty

    Is physics a career path for me?

    Career Potential

    • Research Assistant
    • Engineering Assistant

    Career Settings

    • Engineering Firms
    • National Labs
    • State, Local, and National Governmental Agencies

    More detailed career information is available from the department.

    43-51 semester hours

    Required major core courses: PHYS 161, 162, 261, 328, 361, 431, 495; 333 or 334; plus the completion of one or more of the following tracks:

    Corequisite courses for all tracks: (16 semester hours): CHEM 121, 123; MATH 140, 141, 240.

    • Earth and Space Track (13 semester hours): GEOG 121, 220; BIOL 114, 474
    • Industrial Physics Track (13 semester hours): BIOL 114, ECON 111 or 112; ENGL 204; CMST 111
    • Recommended courses: CHEM 124, 126; MATH 110 (or 311), 320, 341.
    • Additional requirements: At least nine credits of required courses (not corequisites), must be completed at East Stroudsburg University. A minimum of a "C" must be obtained in each of the required courses.

  • Program Curriculum Plan (Professional Track)

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      MATH 140 GE: Calculus I

      4

      CHEM 121 GE: General Chemistry I

      3

      CHEM 123 GE: General Chemistry I Laboratory

      1

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      14

      Spring

      PHYS 161 GE: Physics I

      4

      CHEM 124 GE: General Chemistry II

      3

      CHEM 126 GE: General Chemistry II Laboratory

      1

      MATH 141 GE: Calculus II

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PHYS 162 GE: Physics II

      4

      PHYS 121 GE: Astronomy I

      3

      PHYS 124: Observational Astronomy Lab

      1

      MATH 240: Multivariate Calculus

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 261: Physics III

      3

      PHYS 328: Mathematical Physics

      3

      PHYS 122 GE: Astronomy II

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 361: Physics IV

      3

      PHYS 428: Theoretical Physics

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      MATH 311: Statistics I

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PHYS 333: Advanced Physics Lab I

      3

      PHYS 431: Electromagnetic Theory

      4

      PHYS 403: Optics

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Senior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 401: Quantum Physics

      3

      PHYS 495: Seminar

      1

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      13

      Spring

      PHYS 421: Statistical Physics

      3

      PHYS 441: Theoretical Mechanics

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      PHYS 123 GE: Introduction to Physical Cosmology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Total Credits

      120

      For more information, contact Program Coordinator John Elwood at 570-422-3408 or e-mail jelwood@po-box.esu.edu.

  • Program Curriculum Plan (Earth and Space Science)

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      MATH 140 GE: Calculus I

      4

      CHEM 121 GE: General Chemistry I

      3

      CHEM 123 GE: General Chemistry I Laboratory

      1

      PHYS 121 GE: Astronomy I

      3

      PHYS 124 GE: Observational Astronomy Lab

      1

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PHYS 161 GE: Physics I

      4

      CHEM 124 GE: General Chemistry II

      3

      CHEM 126 GE: General Chemistry II Laboratory

      1

      MATH 141 GE: Calculus II

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PHYS 162 GE: Physics II

      4

      GEOG 121 GE: Physical Geology

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      MATH 240: Multivariate Calculus

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      17

      Spring

      PHYS 261: Physics III

      3

      PHYS 328: Mathematical Physics

      3

      PHYS 304 GE: Modern Physical Astronomy

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 361: Physics IV

      3

      PHYS 333: Advanced Physics Lab 1

      3

      GEOG 220 GE: Meteorology

      3

      BIOL 114 GE: Intorductory Biology

      3

      General Education Elective

      4

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      PHYS 431: Electromagnetic Theory

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      14

      Senior Year

      Fall

      BIOL 474: Oceanography

      3

      Elective

      3

      Elective

      3

      Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 421: Statistical Physics

      3

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      PHYS 495: Seminar

      1

      Earth Science Elective

      3

      Elective

      4

      FIT Elective

      1

      Subtotal

      15

      Total Credits

      120

      For more information, contact Program Coordinator John Elwood at 570-422-3408 or e-mail jelwood@po-box.esu.edu.

  • Program Curriculum Plan (Industrial Track)

    • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

      Freshman Year

      Fall

      ENGL 103: English Composition

      3

      MATH 140 GE: Calculus I

      4

      CHEM 121 GE: General Chemistry I

      3

      CHEM 123 GE: General Chemistry I Laboratory

      1

      PHYS 111: Engineering Graphics

      2

      ECON 111 or 112 GE: Principle of Macro/Microeconomics

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PHYS 161 GE: Physics I

      4

      CHEM 124 GE: General Chemistry II

      3

      CHEM 126 GE: General Chemistry II Laboratory

      1

      MATH 141 GE: Calculus II

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Sophomore Year

      Fall

      PHYS 162 GE: Physics II

      4

      PHYS 220: Statistics

      3

      ENGL 204: Technical Writing

      3

      MATH 240: Multivariate Calculus

      4

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 261: Physics III

      3

      PHYS 328: Mathematical Physics

      3

      PHYS 202: Dynamics

      3

      CMST 111 GE: Speech Communication

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Junior Year

      Fall

      PHYS 361: Physics IV

      3

      PHYS 240: Basic Electronics

      3

      PHYS 333: Advanced Physics Lab 1

      3

      BIOL 114 GE: Introductory Biology

      4

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      16

      Spring

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      PHYS 431: Electromagnetic Theory

      4

      FIT Elective

      1

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      14

      Senior Year

      Fall

      Physic Elective

      3

      Physic Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      General Education Elective

      3

      Subtotal

      15

      Spring

      PHYS 415: Computational Physics

      3

      PHYS 495: Seminar

      1

      PHYS 493: Research

      3

      Physic Elective

      3

      FIT Elective

      1

      Elective

      4

      Subtotal

      15

      Total Credits

      120

      For more information, contact Program Coordinator John Elwood at 570-422-3408 or e-mail jelwood@po-box.esu.edu.

Secondary Education

  • Bachelor of Science in Physics - Secondary Education

    • Are you interested in...

      • Astronomy, Electronics, or Geology
      • Sharing your love of science with others
      • Encouraging students to discover the world around them
      • Helping students begin careers in science

      Choose Physics — Secondary Education at ESU

      • Small class sizes
      • Practical field experiences
      • Highly qualified and experienced faculty
      • Partnerships with area school districts

      Is Physics — Secondary education a career path for me?

      Career Potential

      • Junior High school Physical Science Teacher
      • High school Physics Teacher

      Career Settings

      • Public High School
      • Private High School or Preparatory Academy

      More detailed career information is available from the department.

      27 semester hours

      The Pennsylvania Department of Education has made some recent changes in teacher certification requirements. Anyone applying for teacher certification after December 31, 2012 will be subject to different program and certification requirements. These requirements will be published pending approval by the Pennsylvania Department of Education and the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

      All teacher education students should be in frequent consultation with their academic advisers to make sure they are meeting the appropriate program and certification requirements which will vary depending on a variety of circumstances.

      Coordinator: Professor Robert Cohen, Department of Physics.

    • Program Curriculum Plan
      • (Subject to change by the university without notice)

        Freshman Year

        Fall

        PSED 161:: Foundations of Education

        3

        General Education Elective - Group C*

        3

        MATH 140 GE: Calculus I**

        4

        General Education Elective - Group A***

        3

        ENGL 103: English Composition

        3

        Subtotal

        16

        Spring

        PHYS 161 GE: Physics I

        4

        MATH 141 GE: Calculus II**

        4

        Computer Science Elective

        3

        General Education Elective - Group C

        3

        Fitness Elective

        1

        Subtotal

        15

        Sophomore Year

        Fall

        PHYS 162 GE: Physics II

        4

        MATH 240: Multivariate Calculus**

        4

        PSED 242: Educational Psychology

        3

        General Education Elective - Group A - Second English

        3

        Fitness Elective

        1

        Subtotal

        15

        Spring

        PHYS 261 GE: Physics III

        3

        General Education Elective - Group C**

        3

        MCOM 262: Educational Communications and Technology

        3

        General Education Elective - Group A

        3

        General Education Elective - Group C

        3

        Subtotal

        15

        Junior Year

        Fall

        REED 321: Teaching of Reading in Secondary Schools

        3

        PHYS 333: Advanced Physics Lab I

        3

        PHYS 361: Physics IV

        3

        General Education Elective - Group C

        3

        CHEM 121 GE: General Chemistry I

        3

        CHEM 123 GE: General Chemistry I Lab

        1

        Subtotal

        16

        Spring

        PSED 420: Seminar in Secondary Education I

        3

        Physics Elective

        3

        CHEM 124 GE: General Chemistry II

        3

        CHEM 126 GE: General Chemistry II Lab

        1

        General Education Elective - Group A

        3

        Physics Elective

        3

        Subtotal

        16

        Senior Year

        Fall

        PSED 421: Seminar in Secondary Education II

        2

        PSED 446: Teaching of Science in the Secondary Schools

        3

        BIOL 114 GE: Introductory Biology I

        4

        Physics Elective

        3

        General Education Elective - Group A

        3

        PHYS 495: Seminar

        1

        Subtotal

        16

        Spring

        PSED 4:30: Student Teaching in Secondary Education/Middle School/Junior High School

        6

        PSED 431: Student Teaching in Secondary Education/Senior High School

        6

        PHYS 499: Student Teaching Internship

        1

        Subtotal

        13

        Total Credits

        122

        *GEOG 120 (Physical Geography) or GEOG 121 (Physical Geology) are recommended.

        **If MATH 135 (Pre-Calculus) is needed, it should be taken the first semester, with MATH 140 (Calculus I), MATH 141 (Calculus II), and MATH 240 (Multivariate Calculus) taken in the following semesters, replacing the General Education course in the spring semester, sophomore year. An extra General Education course would then be needed, usually scheduled during the summer.

        ***CMST 111 (Speech Communications) is recommended.

        Teacher education program requirements have been changed to reflect new certification rules for students applying for certification after December 31, 2012.

        For more information, contact Program Coordinator Robert Cohen at 570-422-3428 or e-mail rcohen@po-box.esu.edu.

Faculty

Course Descriptions

  • PHYS 101 GE: Physical Science - Force, Matter and Energy (3)

    • This course examines selected fundamental concepts necessary to the understanding of physical phenomena. Topics included are motion, atomic structure, waves, heat and thermodynamics, and nuclear science. Science as a process – its attributes, strengths, and limitations – is also examined. Demonstrations dealing with physical principles characterize much of the course.

  • PHYS 102 GE: Physics Liberal Art (3)

    • This course acquaints students with what physics is and how it is important. It provides an introduction to physics and its development, examines the physical world in which we live, and explores issues and technologies with which physicists and engineers are involved. This course does not involve problem solving and is available to non-science majors with a non-mathematical background.

  • PHYS 103 Science for Involvement (3)

    • This course is offered primarily for non-science majors, to help students attain the science literacy and science competencies which are the foundation for acceptable performance in their own chosen fields. The course is group interaction– and activity– oriented, based upon students' selections from a list of the suggested topics.

  • PHYS 105 GE: Physics for the Inquiring Mind (3)

    • This is a descriptive course designed to raise the level of scientific literacy, particularly in the basic tenets of physics. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, satellite trajectories, and several areas of current interest.

  • PHYS 106 GE: Modern Physics (3)

    • The course examines recent developments that have led to our current understanding of nature and have influenced human thought and values. The universal symmetries, relativity, and quantum mechanics will be examined in depth by exploring the processes of reasoning and investigation that led to their discoveries and a connection sought between modern physical thinking and events of the current scene.

  • PHYS 107 GE: Physics and Forensic Science (3)

    • The course considers forensic evidence and the reliability of the data analyzed in the laboratory. It looks at basic physics principles found in optics, statics and kinesmatics and shows how forensic scientists apply them to court room evidence.

  • PHYS 110 GE: Sound Waves and Light (3)

    • This course is designed to inform the students of the wave nature of the physical world. It is a qualitative presentation of the phenomena of sound, light, electricity, and magnetism.

  • PHYS 111 Engineering Graphics (2)

    • This course includes multiview projections, pictorial drawings, dimensioning, engineering standards and working drawings. It involves an introduction to creative design, space analysis, graphs, graphical mathematics, vector analysis, and design implementation (CAD and manual). Prerequisite: MATH 120 or 121.

  • PHYS 116 Energy Conservation in the Home (3)

    • In order to provide a comfortable lifestyle for future generations as well as the present one, intelligent well-informed decisions are necessary. The material presented in this course will help the student understand the problems, options, and costs involved in such decisions so that the student may take informed actions in the use of energy.

  • PHYS 117 GE: Energy (3)

    • This course introduces the concept of energy in all its forms and discusses its role in modern society. Discussions include sources of energy, along with their social and environmental impact.

  • PHYS 118 GE: Solar Energy (3)

    • This is a course designed to inform the student of the source of solar energy, what's being done to harness this energy, and how students may benefit from solar devices they may build themselves. The course requires very simple calculations and includes the construction of one solar device. Also included are several detailed analyses of the economics of home solar systems.

  • PHYS 121 GE: Astronomy I: The Sky and Solar System (3)

    • This course in descriptive astronomy deals with the scientific principles essential to the understanding of astronomy. Topics covered include basic observational astronomy, the historical development of astronomy, spectroscopy and telescopes, planetary science, the origin and evolution of the solar system, and the sun as a star.

  • PHYS 122 GE: Astronomy II: Stars and Galaxies (3)

    • This course in descriptive astronomy is a continuation of Astronomy I. The topics covered include observational properties of stars, stellar life cycles, pulsars and black holes, the Milky Way Galaxy, extragalactic astronomy, quasars, and cosmology. Prerequisite: PHYS 121.

  • PHYS 123 GE: Introduction to Physical Cosmology (3)

    • This is a descriptive course which introduces current theories on the origin and evolution of the universe. Particular emphasis is placed on how ideas from such diverse areas of study as extragalactic astronomy, relativity, and particle physics have combined to provide a reasonably coherent theory of the beginning of time and the cosmos. Prerequisite: Honors Program.

  • PHYS 124 Observational Astronomy Lab (1)

    • This course is intended to give the student experience in the observational techniques of modern astronomy. The course is designed to complement Physics 122 Astronomy 2, but may be taken with Physics 121 Astronomy I. Corequisite: PHYS 121 or 122.

  • PHYS 131 GE: Fundamental Physics I (4)

    • Together with Fundamental Physics II, this course covers basic principles and methods of all branches of classical physics at an introductory level. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, waves, optics, heat, electricity, and magnetism. Prerequisite: MATH 135.

  • PHYS 132 GE: Fundamental Physics II (4)

    • Physics 132 is a continuation of Physics 131. Topics covered include electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic radiation and optics. Some brief material on atomic and nuclear physics as well as quantum mechanics is introduced where possible. Prerequisites: PHYS 131; MATH 135.

  • PHYS 151 Physics of Flight (3)

    • This course is intended to give its students knowledge of the forces acting on aircraft in flight maneuvers, the mechanisms of each flight and engine instrument, aircraft electronics, reference frames used in flight navigation, very high frequency omni range navigation techniques, non-directional beacon navigation techniques, the physical background for federal aviation regulations, and necessary weather consideration.

  • PHYS 152 Physics of Flight Lab (1)

    • This course is intended to give the student practical applications of the theoretical aspects of the topics covered in PHYS 151. Included in this lab are 10 hours of flight instruction with an FAA certified flight instructor or a student's solo license, whichever comes first. An additional fee is required. Contact the Department of Physics for details.

  • PHYS 161 GE: Physics I (4)

    • Together with Physics II, this course covers basic principles and methods of all branches of classical physics at an introductory level. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, gravitation, waves, optics, heat electricity and magnetism. Prerequisite: MATH 140.

  • PHYS 162 GE: Physics II (4)

  • PHYS 201 Statics (3)

    • This course examines the composition and resolution of forces, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, centroids, moments and products of inertia, distributed forces, analysis of structures, analysis of beams, friction, and virtual work. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, MATH 140, 141 concurrently.

  • PHYS 202 Dynamics (3)

    • This course considers dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, relative motion, dynamic equilibrium, D'Alembert's principle, work, energy, impulse, and momentum. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 201; MATH 141.

  • PHYS 240 Basic Electronics (4)

    • This course is an introduction to basic electronics and instrumentation for scientists. The goal is to introduce the student to modern electronic circuit building blocks – integrated circuits and electronic sensors along with electronic instrumentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the application of the personal computer (PC) as a virtual electronic instrument. The students will receive hands on experience in the use of LabView software that provides a graphical programming environment to use the computer plug-in cards and a PC for analysis and display. This new technology will be used in the study of basic electronic and DC circuits, semiconductor circuit devices (transistors) and analog and digital integrated circuits. Prerequisites: Completion of an introductory physics course and/or permission of the instructor.

  • PHYS 241 Linear and Digital Electronics (3)

    • This course is designed for students in the sciences or computer sciences who wish to review basic electricity and how electronic components are combined to form linear (e.g. amplifier) and digital functions.

  • PHYS 251 CJA: Traffic Accident Investigation (3)

    • The course considers the physical aspects of traffic accident investigation and reconstruction. Included are such topics as recording information, photography, dynamics of vehicles, and speed determination. It is offered in cooperation with the Institute of Criminal Justice Administration.

  • PHYS 252 CJA: Advanced Criminalistics (3)

    • This course considers forensic evidence and data disclosed in the laboratory and its reliability. An understanding of the scope of expert examinations is achieved. The nature of the results expected from laboratory inquiries conducted by trained specialists is realized.

  • PHYS 253 CJA: Fire and Arson Investigation (3)

    • This course considers the physical aspects of fire and arson investigation. Included are such topics as properties of materials, physical aspects of fires, physical examination of the fire scene to determine origin, ignition sources and their physical aspects, and characteristic physical features indicating incendiarism.

  • PHYS 261 Physics III (3)

    • This course extends the concepts of PHYS 161 and PHYS 162 to an exploration of wave phenomena, thermodynamics, and special relativity. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 162, MATH 140, 141 and 240 or concurrent enrollment.

  • PHYS 290 Special Topics (Semester hours arranged)

    • These courses are designed to meet specific needs of groups of students or are offered on a trial basis in order to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the university curriculum.

  • PHYS 301 Strength of Materials (3)

    • This course explores strength and elasticity of materials, theory of stresses and strains, deflection of beams and shafts, torsion, and buckling of structures. Prerequisites: PHYS 201, MATH 140.

  • PHYS 304 Modern Physical Astronomy (3)

    • This course is a quantitative treatment of modern astronomy stressing the application of basic physics for investigating the properties of celestial bodies and systems. Topics will include basic celestial mechanics, radiation and matter, stellar structure and evolution, the structure and motions of galaxies, and cosmology. Prerequisites: PHYS 131 or 161, 121, 122, MATH 140. Corequisite: PHYS 132 or 162.

  • PHYS 305 Physics of the Atmosphere (3)

    • This course provides an introduction to the physical process of the atmosphere. Mechanisms affecting heat, moisture and air motion are investigated and related to atmospheric phenomena. Prerequisites: MATH 140, PHYS 131 or 161, GEOG 220, CHEM 121.

  • PHYS 328 Mathematical Physics (3)

    • This course introduces the student to common problem-solving techniques used in solving advanced physics problems. Many typical mathematical tools that are essential to solving physics problems are introduced and practiced in this course. Prerequisites: PHYS 162, MATH 240.

  • PHYS 333 Advanced Physics Lab I (3)

    • This course is an open-ended but directed laboratory activity in both classical and modern physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 162. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 261.

  • PHYS 334 Advanced Physics Lab II (3)

    • This course has the same description as PHYS 333, but different experiments are performed. These two courses can be taken in either order. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHYS 261.

  • PHYS 350 Cognitive Science (3)

    • This interdisciplinary course is a study of a topic of common interest in computer science, linguistics, physical science, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology, namely the acquisition, organization, and expression of knowledge. Prerequisite: Honors Program.

  • PHYS 361 Physics IV (3)

    • This course introduces the student to the physics of atoms, molecules, nuclei and elementary particles. The course includes early quantum theory, relativistic mechanics, and the wave and quantum properties of photons and electrons; Schrodinger's equation, and its application to the structure of atoms, molecules, and solids; nuclear physics, elementary particles. Prerequisite: PHYS 261, MATH 240, and PHYS 328 or concurrent enrollment.

  • PHYS 370 The Rise of Modern Science and Technology (3)

    • The Rise of Modern Science and Technology is an in-depth study of the development of modern physical science and its connection to technology. The models that are considered training points for scientific theory are examined in detail. The mutual interaction of science and technology is presented within the context of scientific development. Prerequisites: Introductory science course at the college level and junior standing; Honors Program.

  • PHYS 380 Radioisotopes (3)

    • This course is a study of the origin and characteristics of nuclear radiations emitted from radioisotopes and their attenuation in matter. Laboratory emphasis is placed upon detection and measurement of nuclear radiations and the use of radioisotopes in scientific studies and research. Prerequisite: PHYS 105 or 117 or 131 or 161.

  • PHYS 401 Quantum Physics (3)

    • This course introduces ideas of wave mechanics and matrix mechanics. Schrodinger's equation is applied to simple problems. Approximation techniques for the more difficult problems of nuclear and atomic physics are studied. Prerequisites: PHYS 361, MATH 341.

  • PHYS 402 Contemporary Topics in Science (3)

    • This course deals with the nature and theoretical basis of recent noteworthy advances in science. Interdisciplinary in design, the course draws its content from the various disciplines of the natural sciences. Emphasis is placed upon topics being reported upon in professional journals. This course also listed as BIOL 402, and CHEM 402. Prerequisite: PHYS 105 or 117 or 121 or 131 or 161.

  • PHYS 403 Optics (3)

    • This course will cover geometrical, wave optics and applications of optical phenomena used in industry with an emphasis on how mathematical models of these phenomena are used. Possible topics include diffraction, fourier optics, basics of coherence theory, laser technology, holography and non-linear optics. Prerequisite: PHYS 261 and 328.

  • PHYS 404 Introductory Astrophysics (3)

    • This is a course in modern astrophysics stressing the application of physical concepts to the study of the heavens. Topics will include radiative transfer, astrophysical radiative processes, stellar structure and evolution, compact stars and black holes, galactic and extragalactic astrophysics, and cosmology. Prerequisites: PHYS 121, 361, MATH 141.

  • PHYS 405 The Development of Modern Physical Science (3)

    • This course examines past works and philosophical thought of noted physical scientists. Emphasis is placed on the nature of scientific discovery and the processes of science. This course is also listed as CHEM 405. Prerequisite: PHYS 105 or 117 or 121 or 131 or 161.

  • PHYS 411 Thermal Physics (3)

    • This course deals with heat and thermodynamics and applications to special systems, kinetic theory of gases, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 162; MATH 141.

  • PHYS 415 Computational Physics (3)

    • This course will introduce students to the new and expanding field of Computational Physics. They will learn how to use the computer to solve equations that cannot be solved analytically ("by hand"). Besides reading and learning about the techniques, students will be expected to actually write software to implement some of the techniques learned in class (as homework). This course is meant to extend CPSC 211 Scientific Computing with FORTRAN to more advanced physics problems. Prerequisites: PHYS 162, CPSC 111 (or 211). Corequisite: MATH 341.

  • PHYS 421 Statistical Physics (3)

    • Students study large-scale systems consisting of many atoms or molecules. Subjects of statistical mechanics, kinetic theory, thermodynamics, and heat are introduced. Prerequisites: PHYS 162, MATH 240.

  • PHYS 423 Advanced Electronics (3)

    • This course will develop the theory of precision operational amplifier circuits, analog to digital converters, digital to analog converters and analog switches. The course will introduce the student to digital design using discrete circuits, PAL's and Field Programmable Gate arrays. The student will learn about the control and interfacing of these circuits to microcontrollers as well as understanding the implications of hardware vs. software control and processing of signals. Prerequisites: PHYS 240, MATH 140, 141 and either PHYS 162 or 132.

  • PHYS 428 Theoretical Physics (3)

    • The main thrust of this course will be the application of various standard mathematical techniques to the solution of upper level problems in Mechanics, Electromagnetism, Wave Theory, Fluid Dynamics, Statistical Mechanics, Quantum Physics, and Relativity. Students considering advanced study or employment in the field of Physics or Engineering are highly encouraged to enroll. Prerequisites: PHYS 261, MATH 240.

  • PHYS 431 Electromagnetic Theory (4)

    • This course starts with an introduction to electrostatic problems. The student is then introduced to special relativity and the Lorentz transformation. Special relativity is then used to transform the electrostatic problem to understand magnetic fields, Maxwell's equations, and electrodynamics. Finally, an introduction to electromagnetic waves and their propagation is developed. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 162. Corequisite: MATH 341.

  • PHYS 432 Applied Electromagnetic Theory: Radio Waves and High Frequency Circuits (4)

    • This course will apply Maxwell's equations to the propagation of electromagnetic waves in free space, wave guides and coaxial cables. The transmission line equation will be developed and analyzed for the case of real practicable transmission line. Maxwell's equations will be used to analyze antennas. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 162, 431 and Math 341.

  • PHYS 433 Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3)

    • This course examines the quantum-mechanical basis of atomic and nuclear structure and studies the phenomena of atomic and nuclear transitions. Prerequisite: PHYS 361.

  • PHYS 441 Theoretical Mechanics (3)

    • This course discusses the application of Newtonian mechanics to more complicated systems than those studied in Physics I. Prerequisites: PHYS 261, 328, MATH 240.

  • PHYS 471 Special Problems in Physics (3)

    • This course introduces the student to detailed and complete treatments of problems which require expertise from several areas. Prerequisites: PHYS 161, 162, 261,361.

  • PHYS 485 Independent Study (Semester hours arranged)

    • This experience is taken upon the initiative of a student who seeks to study with a knowledgeable faculty member in order to deepen a specific interest in a particular academic discipline. Independent study is a process through which a student either sharply increases his/her already advanced knowledge of a subject matter or increases his/her appreciation about an academic discipline that is related to a student's advanced knowledge of a subject. The proposed independent study must be submitted to the department for approval. The faculty member supervising the independent study must provide a minimum of five (5) hours of time per credit hour upon request of the student. Prerequisite: PHYS 105 or 131 or 161.

  • PHYS 486 Field Experience and Internships (Semester hours arranged)

  • PHYS 493 Research in Physics (3)

    • This course is an experimental investigation selected by the student in consultation with a member of the faculty and carried out under the faculty's supervision. Approximately twelve hours of research per week is required for three credits. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing as a physics major or by permission of the department.

  • PHYS 495 Seminar (1)

    • Participants perform self-guided, in-depth examinations of relatively common phenomena, contemporary issues and/or recent research in physical and related fields. Supporting evidence and theory is documented in formal written and/or oral reports by participants. Attendance in departmental colloquia is required. Prerequisites: PHYS 131 and 132, or 161 and 162.

  • PHYS 499 Student Teaching Internship (1)

    • This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to work with a faculty member in the student's primary Arts and Sciences discipline during the student teaching experience. The course will enhance the student's ability to understand and maximize the relationship between disciplinary subject matter and pedagogy.