Modern Languages

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College of Arts and Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Letters

Stroud Hall, Room 208

570-422-3407......www.esu.edu/ml

About the Program

Studying a language at East Stroudsburg University offers students an ideal opportunity to broaden their intellectual horizons, improve their communication skills, and gain a genuine understanding of another culture. Students may greatly enhance their prospects of employment by pursuing Spanish or French either as an autonomous major or as a second major in conjunction with such disciplines as Business, Health Studies, Psychology, Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism, English, History or Communications, among other fields.

Employment / Career Opportunities

As employment opportunities become increasingly international in their orientation, language majors may find new career possibilities in the realms of international business, media or technology. With a careful selection of courses supplementing their language major, it is possible for a student to pursue graduate studies in medicine, business, or law. Whatever a student’s professional interest, pursuing the study of another language can only enhance the potential for success while increasing marketability.

Department of Modern Languages / Program

The primary mission of the Department of Modern Languages at East Stroudsburg University is to offer students a comprehensive program of studies in French or Spanish. Students may choose from a Bachelor of Arts degree -- typically leading to a career in translation, business, government, or social services -- or a Bachelor of Science degree, which includes K-12 teaching certification.

A strong minor in German Interdisciplinary Studies is also offered by the department. This program draws from language courses and German-related coursework in History, Economics, Geography, Political Sciences and other departmental areas. Chinese, French and Spanish minors are also offered, each with distinct components in language and culture.

Complementing the majors and minors is a variety of additional language offerings, including Arabic, Italian, Japanese, Portuguese and Russian. Of these, Italian is regularly offered, with others scheduled according to demand. Latin is offered each year.

Whatever level of language study chosen by the student, the basic goal remains the same: to acquire useful proficiency in that language with meaningful cultural knowledge. In its pursuit of these goals, the department follows the guidelines and standards established by such professional organizations as the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL), the Modern Language Association (MLA), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the various professional organizations affiliated with those languages in which degrees are offered (AATSP, AATF, AATG and CLT).

Overseas Travel / Study

Overseas travel and study opportunities offer students unparalleled insight into the language and culture, and also shed new light on professional possibilities. Study abroad is a transformative experience on many levels. The great majority of ESU language majors and minors opt to spend a month, a semester or a full academic year in another country. ESU’s Office of International Programs assists students with choosing a destination, academic integration of overseas credits, financial planning and issues of acculturation. As a member of the National Student Exchange (NSE) and the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP), ESU ensures that students receive the widest possible selection of destinations at the lowest possible cost.

Are you interested in...

  • Becoming fluent in a second or third language?
  • Gaining a competitive edge with a valuable second major?
  • Unique travel experiences?
  • Exploring other cultures in-depth?

Choose Modern Languages at ESU

  • Small class sizes
  • Skilled faculty from around the world
  • Intersections with Business, Health Studies, etc.
  • Extensive career placement
  • State-of-the-art Language Learning Center
  • Affordable study abroad

Is Language Study a career path for me?

Career Potential

  • Language Educator
  • Translator / Interpreter
  • Hospitality Program Manager
  • Bilingual Specialist in Healthcare, Sales, Social Work
  • Linguist

Career Settings

  • K-12 Schools
  • International Business
  • Media Communications
  • Technology
  • United Nations or Peace Corps
  • Graduate School

More detailed career information is available from the department.

Bachelor of Arts in French

  • Majors/Minors into this program are no longer being accepted

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

    • Required major courses: MLSP 310, 315 (or 416), 336; MLNG 361; 18 additional MLSP credits (any course except MLSP 116, 120 and 231), three of which must be met with a 400-level literature course.
    • Please see the university requirements in this catalog.

    Notes for B.A. Degrees:

    1. All students pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree in French or Spanish must complete a minimum of 12 credits at ESU in their target language at a level higher than Language 215 (Language IV). Of these 12 credits, a minimum of three (3) credits must be at the 400 level.
    2. Students must maintain a minimum quality point average of 2.50 in the major. No grade less than "C" will be accepted in any course within the major.
    3. The department very strongly encourages students majoring in a language to participate in study abroad. Appropriate credit will be awarded for courses taken through programs approved by the department.
    4. Additional information can be found below (see General Notes section) and in the Department of Modern Languages.

Bachelor of Science with a French Major (Education)

  • Majors/Minors into this program are no longer being accepted

    • Required major courses: MLFR 235, 315, 336, 343, MLNG 361, 499; 15 additional credits in MLFR (any course except MLFR 116, 117, 120, 141 and 231), three of which must be met with a 400-level literature course.
    • Required professional education courses: PSED 150, 250, 416, 420, 421, 430, 431; REED 350; SPED 350.
    • Required tests: See section "Notes" for details on departmental assessments, GPA requirements, PSED, etc.
    • Please see the university requirements in this catalog.

Bachelor of Science with a Spanish Major (Education)

    • Required major courses: MLSP 310, 315 (or 416), 336; MLNG 361, 499; 18 additional MLSP credits (any course except MLSP 116, 117, 120 and 231), three of which must be met with a 400 level literature course.
    • Required professional education courses: PSED 150, 250, 416, 420, 421, 430, 431; REED 350; SPED 350.
    • Required tests: See section "Notes" for details on departmental assessments, GPA requirements, PSED, etc.
    • Please see the university requirements in this catalog.

    Notes for B.S. Degrees:

    1. The Pennsylvania Department of Education has made some recent changes in teacher certification requirements. Please refer to the section "The College of Education" in this Undergraduate Catalog for specific requirements for admission into teacher education programs. ALL teacher education students should be in frequent consultation with both of their academic advisers - PSED and language - to make sure they are meeting the appropriate program and certification requirements. These will vary depending on a variety of circumstances.
    2. All students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in French or Spanish must maintain a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the major. No grade less than "C" will be accepted for the major. See PSED for additional GPA requirements.
    3. Students must complete an English-literature course (in addition to ENGL 103) and TWO Math courses. See the English, Math and PSED departments for additional information, as certain courses will not count in fulfillment of these requirements.
    4. Certification encompasses kindergarten through grade 12.
    5. All students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in French or Spanish must complete a minimum of 12 credits at ESU in their target language at a level higher than Language 215 (Language IV). Of these 12 credits, a minimum of three (3) credits must be at the 400 level.
    6. Students seeking a Bachelor of Science degree or certification in French or Spanish must pass through a series of eight assessments that are mandates as part of the department's NCATE accreditation status (National Recognition). These include: (1) the Praxis II World Languages exam (French or Spanish); (2) a Target-Language Linguistics Exam; (3) a Unit Plan; (4) two observations during Student Teaching; (5) the Student Teaching Practicum; (6) the ACTFL telephonic Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI); (7) the Capstone Exam in Civilization of the French- or Spanish-speaking world; and (8) an Essay of Reflections on Study Abroad. See the department for further details.
    7. Students must take the OPI before entering student teaching, passing at the Advanced Low level or higher. Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in French or Spanish will also be required to demonstrate appropriate language proficiency through an exit interview conducted by faculty members within the appropriate language component.
    8. The department very strongly encourages students majoring in a language to participate in study abroad. Appropriate credit will be awarded for courses taken through programs approved by the department.
    9. Additional information can be found below (see 'General Notes' section) and in the Department of Modern Languages.

    Students Returning for Certification Only:

    A. Requirements for Students with a Previous Degree in a Field other than Language of Certification

    These students must follow all requirements as set forth for the Bachelor of Science candidates, the equivalent of an undergraduate B.S. major in French or Spanish. Appropriate course work equivalencies will be credited upon review of transcripts. Native-speakers must take all course work at the 300-400 levels.

    B. Requirements for Students with a Previous Degree in Language of Certification

    These students will be handled on a case-by-case basis. An oral interview and written assignment in the target language will be administered by members of the faculty from the language area. Following this initial interview, the faculty of the language area, in consultation with the chair, will decide upon the number of additional credits (if any) required of the candidate.

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science with a Double Major - Modern Language + Modern Language

  • General Notes Applicable to B.A. and B.S. Majors:

    Non-counting Courses

    The following courses may not be counted toward the major: MLFR 116, 117 (except for BA major), 120 and 141; MLSP 116, 117 (except for BA major), 120 and 231. These courses do count toward General Education.

    Departmental Authorization of Credits for Native Speakers

    This option is available only to native speakers of French or Spanish. Such a student will apply for authorization only after having spent at least two semesters at East Stroudsburg University and only after having completed two language courses at ESU at the 300 level or above, and having earned a GPA of 3.0 or better in the major.

    The student will be required to write a detailed essay in the target language concerning the extent and nature of prior language experiences, as well as related cultural themes. Each application will receive the consideration of the total department membership, and the decision concerning the number of credits to be granted will be decided collaboratively between the department chair and the professors of the language area in question. The maximum number of credits which may be granted by the department is six.

    The Department of Modern Languages may authorize credit only for those languages in which it offers a major, namely French or Spanish. This policy also applies to any credits granted through the CLEP examination.

    Native speakers choosing a major in their native language will be required to complete at least 12 credits at the 300-400 level, in addition to required courses.

    Please note: Native speakers choosing courses in their native language (but not majoring in the language) will be placed in appropriate courses by the department.

    General Education Offerings

    Students with advanced language skills who start a language sequence at a level above the GE courses listed may substitute that course(s) as valid GE offerings.

Chinese Language and Culture Minor

    • Required courses: MLCH 116, MLCH 117, MLCH 214, MLCH 215
    • Co-requisites: Six credits from the following list: MLCH 221, MLCH 235, SOC 201, PHIL 212, POLS 230, CMST 310, HIST 313, GEOG 330, POLS 420.
    • Additional Requirements:
      • Six credits must be taken at ESU.
      • Students must participate in an exchange program (either locally or abroad) or in a substitute experience as approved by the Chair.
      • Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in all coursework for the minor.

German Interdisciplinary Studies Minor

  • Majors/Minors into this program are no longer being accepted

    The nine German credits may be chosen from MLGR 116, 117, 120, 214, or other German courses with departmental authorization. These German courses may be transferred from other accredited institutions.

    Corequisites may be chosen from ART 202, ART 305, ART 307, ART 317, ENGL 273, GEOG 234, MLGR 120, HIST 281, HIST 371, HIST 473, PHIL 318, PHIL 418, PHIL 457, POLS 272, POLS 332, POLS 426. With the mutual consent of the German component and the Chair, substitutions for these courses may occur.

    At least two courses in the minor must be at the 300-400 level, or qualify as advanced courses.

    A minimum of nine credits must be taken in residence at ESU.

    A minimum QPA of 2.5 must be maintained in program courses.

Spanish Minor

  • Twelve semester hours in the minor must be completed at East Stroudsburg University. This residency requirement applies to all students, including transfer students who arrive with credits completed elsewhere.

    Students are required to maintain a GPA of 2.50. No grade less than "C" will be accepted in any course within the minor. Native speakers choosing a minor in their native language will be required to complete twelve credits at the 300-400 level.

Faculty

Course Descriptions

  • MLNG 120 GE: Classical Mythology (3:3:0)

    • This course will study the nature and development of classical mythology through its various manifestations in the Greco-Roman world. Topics will include cosmology, Homeric heroes, the Olympians, fertility myths, and ancient religious customs. The class will read from a wide range of primary texts (Homer, Ovid, Virgil) and will also examine the legacy of classical mythology in selected works of modern art and literature.

  • MLNG 361 Introduction to Linguistics (3:3:0)

    • This course examines the nature of language. Characteristics of phonological and grammatical systems and techniques of linguistic analysis are considered. The field of linguistics is discussed. Prerequisite: Advanced standing.

  • MLNG 485 Independent Study (semester hours to be arranged)

    • This course will provide an opportunity for students to receive further language instruction or engage in directed research and study of a selected topic on an individual basis. Specific course requirements and evaluations will be developed by the instructor and approved by the chair. Prerequisites: For languages, two courses in the appropriate language or culture area, if those courses exist; for directed research, advanced standing of 75 credits.

  • MLNG 499 Student Teaching Internship (1:0:0)

    • This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to work with a faculty member in the student’s primary Arts and Sciences discipline during the student teaching experience. The course will enhance the student’s ability to understand and maximize the relationship between disciplinary subject matter and pedagogy. Prerequisite: Qualification to student teach. Concurrent registration in PSED 430 or 431.

  • Arabic

    • MLAR 116 GE: Arabic I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course in elementary Arabic. Emphasis will be placed on developing basic oral proficiency, studying the structure of the language, and examining its relevant cultural contexts. Multimedia resources at the Language Learning Center will supplement course materials. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, are admitted. This is not a course for heritage speakers of Arabic.

    • MLAR 117 GE: Arabic II (3:3:0)
      • This course completes the first-year introduction to Arabic, providing students with the knowledge and skills needed to function at the elementary level. Emphasis will be placed on developing oral proficiency appropriate to level II, studying grammatical structures of the language, and further examining relevant cultural context. Multimedia resources at the Language Learning Center will supplement course materials. Prerequisites: MLAR 116 or the equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years high school study. This is not a course for heritage speakers of Arabic.

  • Asian Languages

    • MLCH 116 GE: Chinese I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course in Chinese language. It will provide the students with the basic skills of speaking and listening. It will include extensive study of language structures and vocabulary aimed at facilitating authentic communication with native speakers. Use of the language lab as determined by the instructor will be required.

    • MLCH 117 GE: Chinese II (3:3:0)
      • This course will further develop skills acquired in Chinese I. It will provide the students with extended practice in speaking and listening. It will include extensive study of language structures and vocabulary aimed at facilitating authentic communication with native speakers. Use of the language lab as determined by the instructor will be required. Prerequisites: MLCH 116.

    • MLCH 120 GE: Chinese Masterpieces in Translation (3:3:0)
      • This course introduces students to key works of Chinese fiction and poetry. Through guided readings in English and via discussion and class projects, students are exposed to the wide cultural impact of this literature and its relevance in today's society. Some basic dimensions of Chinese-English literary translation are addressed. No prior experience with Chinese is presumed.

    • MLCH 214 GE: Chinese III (3:3:0)
      • This course is a third-semester course designed to advance students toward intermediate proficiency in Chinese (Mandarin). Reading, writing, listening and speaking skills will be developed via textbook and multimedia resources both in and out of the classroom, with a communicative orientation emphasizing authentic cultural content and real-world competencies. Prerequisites: MLCH 117, or equivalent.

    • MLCH 215 GE: Chinese IV (3:3:0)
      • This course is a fourth-semester course designed to advance students toward upper-intermediate proficiency in Chinese (Mandarin). Reading, writing, listening and speaking skills will be developed via textbook and multimedia resources both in and out of the classroom, with a communicative orientation emphasizing authentic cultural content and real-world competencies. Prerequisites: MLCH 214, or equivalent.

    • MLCH 221 Reading Chinese (3:3:0)
      • Written Chinese texts from the realms of business, health-related services, literature, philosophy and science form the core materials for this intermediate-level course. Its purpose is to improve each student's facility in reading Chinese (Mandarin). A systematic review of language structures and regular acquisition of new vocabulary will accompany the guided readings. Simplified Chinese Characters will be used almost exclusively in these readings. Prerequisite: MLCH 215 or equivalent.

    • MLCH 235 Chinese Listening and Speaking (3:3:0)
      • The purpose of this intermediate-level course is to improve each student's speaking and listening comprehension in Chinese (Mandarin). This is accomplished via authentic Chinese sources (newscasts, music, radio, readings, etc.), practice with communicative situations, ongoing grammatical study and continuing expansion of vocabulary. Prerequisite: MLCH 215 or equivalent.

    • MLJA 116 GE: Japanese I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course in Japanese language. It will provide the students with the basic skills of speaking and listening. It will include extensive study of language structures and vocabulary aimed at facilitating authentic communication with native speakers. Use of the language lab as determined by the instructor will be required. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study in the language, or no more than 1 year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLJA 117 GE: Japanese II (3:3:0)
      • This course will further develop skills acquired in Japanese I. It will provide the students with extended practice in speaking and listening. It will include extensive study of language structures and vocabulary aimed at facilitating authentic communication with native speakers. Use of the language lab as determined by the instructor will be required. Prerequisites: MLJA 116 or equivalent of no more than one semester of college-level study.

  • French

    • MLFR 116 GE: French I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course designed for the beginning student. It includes the study of grammar and reading materials and emphasizes social and cultural values. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLFR 117 GE: French II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of French I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: MLFR 116 or equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

    • MLFR 120 GE: French Masterpieces in Translation (3:3:0)
      • This is a general education course open to all students except French majors. It includes reading and analysis of representative French works, done in English translation, of the 19th and 20th centuries.

    • MLFR 141 GE: French Influence on European Culture (3:3:0)
      • This course, in English translation, concentrates on original esthetic texts, which reveal the movement of ideas at two high points in French civilization. It shows the reasoning behind French baroque, classicism, romanticism, symbolism, Dadaism, and Surrealism. This course is open to all students except French majors.

    • MLFR 214 GE: French III (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to improve the communicative skills of students who have studied French for one year in college or four years in high school. Students will practice patterns of grammatical structures both orally and in written exercises. Prerequisites: MLFR 117, or four years of high school French.

    • MLFR 215 GE: French IV (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of the French III course, and is designed to further develop those skills already learned. New grammatical concepts will be learned as well. Prerequisite: MLFR 214 or equivalent high school preparation.

    • MLFR 221 Reading French (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in learning to read French. Students will develop both active and passive vocabulary through reading materials, which are graded as to level of difficulty. Prerequisite: MLFR 214 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 231 GE: French for Travelers (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate language course designed for the student who wishes to acquire conversational skills, which will enable the student to travel more efficiently and with greater language ease in French-speaking countries. Prerequisites: MLFR 116 and 117, or equivalent.

    • MLFR 235 Listening/Speaking French (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the listening/speaking skills in the target language. The exercises will include conversations, commercials, and formal speeches. Students will be able to distinguish between formal and colloquial language. Prerequisite: MLFR 214 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 251 Translation: French (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the facility of translation into English with texts, which are graded as to level of difficulty. Readings may include several modern short stories, current newspaper articles, magazine articles, and excerpts from various texts. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLFR 214 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 290 Special Topics (3) (Semester hours arranged)
      • These courses are designed to meet specific needs of students. Such courses are offered on a trial basis to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the curriculum.

    • MLFR 301 Introduction to French and Francophone Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course includes reading and analysis of representative works of French and Francophone literature. Students will develop their linguistic skills through a series of interpretative essays and oral reports. Prerequisite: MLFR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 302 French and Francophone Media (3:3:0)
      • This course will introduce students to the diversity of present-day media in France and the French-speaking world. The course will cover a wide range of sources including print (newspapers, magazines), audio (live and recorded radio broadcasts), video (recorded programs from French television), and various electronic resources. Class participation, oral reports and written assignments will emphasize the development of language skills needed to comprehend and discuss the issues raised. Prerequisite: MLFR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 305 French and Francophone Cinema (3:3:0)
      • This French-language course is a diachronic examination of the birth and maturation of two intimately related yet distinct film industries: that of France, and that of the Francophone world. Students will view in their entirety a dozen canonical films from these traditions, including works by Jean Renoir, Francois Truffaut, and Ousmane Sembene. Students will be asked to produce oral or written responses to the films they see, as well as a capstone paper. Prerequisites: MLFR 215 or 4 years of high school French.

    • MLFR 307 French for Professional Communication (3:3:0)
      • Students will read, discuss, evaluate and translate a variety of sources reflecting current developments in the realms of business, science and technology. There will be an introduction to the specialized vocabulary of each profession with extensive practice in discussing topics relevant to these fields. Students will complete a series of oral and written assignments, including technical translations. Prerequisite: MLFR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 312 French Poetry (3:3:0)
      • This course will trace the evolution of poetic discourse in France, focusing on four periods: Renaissance love lyric, the Romantic poetics of hyperbole, Symbolist poetics (Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarme) and twentieth-century innovations (Apollinaire, Valery, Breton, Eluard, Ponge, Michaux). The intertexual relationship of poetry to painting and music will help situate our reading within a broad cultural context. Students will present several reports and write brief essays in French on the poems studied. Prerequisite: MLFR 215 and MLFR 301 or equivalent.

    • MLFR 315 French Grammar and Composition (3:3:0)
      • This course consists of a thorough review of grammar, verbs, and idioms with much practical exercise in composition; it is required for all majors. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLFR 235.

    • MLFR 336 French Oral Practice (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed to help the student attain fluency in French. It includes a presentation, discussion, and criticism of timed oral reports on a wide variety of subjects, as well as individual use of the language laboratory. The class limit is 12 students and offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLFR 235.

    • MLFR 343 French Civilization (3:3:0)
      • This course covers the history, geography and cultural trends of France from early periods to the modern-day. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLFR 215.

    • MLFR 401 Paris as Cultural Icon (3:3:0)
      • This course will examine selected works of fiction, poetry, films, paintings, photographs and other cultural artifacts which reflect the status of Paris as the capital of French culture. The class will study the links between the city’s artistic status and the transformations operated by Haussmann, Mitterand and other civic leaders. Prerequisites: MLFR 301, and MLFR 215 or 4 years of high school French.

    • MLFR 417 The French Literature of Ideas (3:3:0)
      • This French-language course is a diachronic examination of how a diverse group of French authors used their writings to express philosophical ideas, or to endorse, comment upon, or attack the philosophical ideas of others. Beginning with the Renaissance, the course moves on to the Classical period, and then the Enlightenment. The twentieth century is given the greatest attention. Prerequisites: FLFR 215 or 4 years of high school French, and MLFR 301.

    • MLFR 423 Nineteenth Century French Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course examines the backgrounds and distinctive features of Romantic and Realistic periods. It includes readings in prose and poetry from representative authors, including Hugo, Vigny, Musset, Stendhal, Balzac, Zola, Flaubert, and Maupassant. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLFR 215, 221.

    • MLFR 424 Twentieth Century French Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course surveys the significant writers of this century, including Proust, Gide, Colette, Sartre, Camus, and Beckett. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLFR 215, 221.

    • MLFR 425 Seventeenth Century French Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course includes readings from Corneille, Racine, Moliere, and other representative writers of the century, as well as supplementary readings and reports on historical backgrounds. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLFR 215, 221.

    • MLFR 426 Modern French Drama (3:3:0)
      • This course surveys the French Theatre from the late 19th century to the present. It includes a study of various dramatic forms as seen in the reading of significant plays. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLFR 215, 221.

    • MLFR 485 Independent Study (semester hours arranged)
    • MLFR 495 Seminar (3:3:0)
  • German

    • MLGR 116 GE: German I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course designed for the beginning student. It includes the study of grammar and reading materials and emphasizes social and cultural values. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLGR 117 GE: German II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of German I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: MLGR 116 or equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

    • MLGR 120 GE: German Masterpieces in Translation (3:3:0)
      • Readings in English translation may include works by Kafka, Mann, Hesse, Brecht, and others. This is a general education course open to all students except German majors. No prerequisite.

    • MLGR 214 GE: German III (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in reviewing German grammar. Students will practice patterns of grammatical structures both orally and in written exercises. Prerequisites: MLGR 117, or 4 years of high school German.

    • MLGR 215 GE: German IV (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of the German III course. The course is designed to further develop skills already learned as well as to introduce grammatical concepts of a more complex nature. Prerequisite: MLGR 214 or equivalent high school preparation.

    • MLGR 221 Reading German (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in learning to read German. Students will develop both active and passive vocabulary through reading materials, which are graded as to level of difficulty. Prerequisite: MLGR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLGR 231 GE: German for Travelers (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate language course designed for the student who wishes to acquire conversational skills, which will enable the student to travel more efficiently and with greater language ease in German-speaking countries. Prerequisites: MLGR 116 and 117, or equivalent.

    • MLGR 235 Listening/Speaking German (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the listening/speaking skills in the target language. The exercises will include conversations, commercials, and formal speeches. Students will be able to distinguish between formal and colloquial language. Prerequisite: MLGR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLGR 251 Translation: German (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the facility of translation into English with texts, which are graded as to level of difficulty. Readings may include several modern short stories, current newspaper articles, magazine articles, and excerpts from various texts. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLGR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLGR 290 Special Topics (3) (Semester hours arranged)
      • These courses are designed to meet specific needs of students. Such courses are offered on a trial basis to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the curriculum.

    • MLGR 315 German Grammar and Composition (3:3:0)
      • This course is a thorough review of grammar with exercises in composition. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLGR 215 or equivalent.

    • MLGR 336 German Oral Practice (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed to help the student attain fluency in German. It includes the presentation, discussion, and criticism of timed oral reports on a wide variety of subjects, memorization of prose and poetry for improving diction, and individual use of the language laboratory. The class is limited to 12 students and is offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLGR 235.

  • Italian

    • MLIT 116 GE: Italian I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course in elementary Italian. It will emphasize the development of conversational skills and the study of basic language structures within a cultural context. Use of the language lab as determined by the instructor will be required.

    • MLIT 117 GE: Italian II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of Italian I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language lab as required by the instructor will be required. Prerequisites: MLIT 116.

    • MLIT 120 GE: Italian Masterpieces in Translation (3:3:0)
      • This course introduces students to key works of Italian fiction and poetry. Through guided readings in English and via discussion and class projects, students are exposed to the broad cultural impact of this literature and its relevance in today's society. Some basic dimensions of Italian-English literary translation are also addressed. No prior experience with Italian is presumed.

    • MLIT 214 GE: Italian III (3:3:0)
      • The purpose of this course is to advance students toward an intermediate proficiency in the four communicative modes (listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as to explore the many facets of Italian and Italian American culture. Prerequisites: MLIT 117, or four years of high school Italian.

    • MLIT 215 GE: Italian IV (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of the Italian III course. This course is designed to further develop intermediate skills already learned, as well as to introduce grammatical concepts of a more complex nature. The many facets of Italian and Italian American culture will continue to be explored. Prerequisites: FLIT 214, or equivalent high school preparation.

  • Latin

    • MLLN 116 GE: Latin I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course designed for the beginning student. It includes the study of grammar and reading materials and emphasizes social and cultural values. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLLN 117 GE: Latin II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of Latin I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: MLLN 116 or equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

    • MLLN 221 Reading Latin (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to develop reading skills in Latin while exploring the fundamental themes and remarkable diversity of Roman literary culture. A sequence of graded readings will include selections from Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Ovid, and Virgil. Prerequisite: MLLN 117 or equivalent.

  • Portuguese

    • MLPG 116 GE: Portuguese I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course in elementary Portuguese. Emphasis will be placed on oral proficiency, the structure of the language, and the variety of its cultural contexts throughout the world. Multimedia resources from the Language Learning Center will supplement course materials. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLPG 117 GE: Portuguese II (3:3:0)
      • This course completes the first-year introduction to Portuguese, providing students with the knowledge and skills to function with elementary fluency in the language. Emphasis will be placed on oral proficiency, the structure of the language, and the variety of its cultural contexts throughout the world. Multimedia resources from the Language Learning Center will supplement course materials. Prerequisites: MLPG 116 or the equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

  • Russian

    • MLRU 116 GE: Russian I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course designed for the beginning student. It includes the study of grammar and reading materials and emphasizes social and cultural values. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLRU 117 GE: Russian II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of Russian I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: MLRU 116 or equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

    • MLRU 120 GE: Masterpieces of Russian Literature in Translation (3:3:0)
      • This General Education course will introduce students to the extraordinary diversity and visionary depth of Russian literature within its historical context. Readings will be drawn from representative 19th and 20th century authors, including Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov and Solzhenitsyn. Brief writing assignments will be required.

  • Spanish

    • MLSP 116 GE: Spanish I (3:3:0)
      • This is a foundation course designed for the beginning student. It includes the study of grammar and reading materials and emphasizes social and cultural values. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisites: Students with no previous study of the language, or no more than one year of previous study, will be admitted.

    • MLSP 117 GE: Spanish II (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of Spanish I. Its purpose is to further reinforce previously acquired basic language skills. Use of the language laboratory as required by the instructor. Prerequisite: MLSP 116 or equivalent of one semester of college-level study, or no more than 2-3 years combined total of junior high/high school language.

    • MLSP 120 GE: Spanish Masterpieces in Translation (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed for non-Spanish majors in which English translations of Peninsular and Latin American literature are read and discussed. Attention is given to cultural understanding and to the interrelationships of literary works. The course is offered on demand.

    • MLSP 143 GE: Spanish Language and Culture Through Media (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed to develop an awareness and understanding of the differences between the cultures of the Spanish-speaking peoples and that of the student. These objectives are met through the use of media, including slides, films, filmstrips, and recordings. This course is open to all students except Spanish majors. The course is conducted in English and offered on demand.

    • MLSP 214 GE: Spanish III (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in reviewing Spanish grammar. Students will practice patterns of grammatical structures both orally and in written exercises. Prerequisites: MLSP 117, or four years of high school Spanish.

    • MLSP 215 GE: Spanish IV (3:3:0)
      • This is a continuation of the Spanish III course. The course is designed to further develop skills already learned, as well as to introduce grammatical concepts of a more complex nature. Prerequisite: MLSP 214 or equivalent high school preparation.

    • MLSP 221 Reading Spanish (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate level course designed to meet the needs of students who are interested in learning to read Spanish. Students will develop both active and passive vocabulary through reading materials which are graded as to level of difficulty. Prerequisite: MLSP 215 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 231 GE: Spanish for Travelers (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate language course designed for the student who wishes to acquire conversational skills which will enable him to travel more efficiently and with greater language ease in Spanish-speaking countries. Prerequisites: MLSP 116 and 117, or equivalent.

    • MLSP 233 Conversational Spanish for Health Services (3:3:0)
      • Practical situations will be simulated in the classroom to provide individuals with basic conversational skills in Spanish in order to communicate with Spanish-speaking patients. Students will learn dialogues based upon typical hospital situations, i.e., parts of the body, useful phrases, and questions for testing, diagnosis, and treatment procedures. Students will also learn to respond more effectively to the needs and requests of the patient. The course may not be counted toward the major in Spanish. Prerequisites: MLSP 116 and 117, or high school equivalent.

    • MLSP 234 Conversational Spanish for Social Services (3:3:0)
      • Practical situations will be simulated in the classroom to provide opportunities for developing conversational skills useful for personnel in social services (i.e., criminal justice administration and social work). The focus will be on appropriate vocabulary, analysis of native mores, expectations of the U.S. system, and other areas that will promote Spanish communication between social service personnel and people of Spanish-speaking backgrounds. The course may not be counted toward the major in Spanish. Prerequisites: MLSP 116 and 117, or high school equivalent.

    • MLSP 235 Listening/Speaking Spanish (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the listening/speaking skills in the target language. The exercises will include conversations, commercials, and formal speeches. Students will be able to distinguish between formal and colloquial language. Prerequisite: MLSP 215 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 251 Translation: Spanish (3:3:0)
      • This is an intermediate course designed to develop the facility of translation into English with texts which are graded as to level of difficulty. Readings include current newspaper articles, magazine articles, and excerpts from various texts. Offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLSP 215 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 290 Special Topics (3:3:0)
      • These courses are designed to meet specific needs of students. Such courses are offered on a trial basis to determine the demand for and value of introducing them as part of the college curriculum.

    • MLSP 305 Spanish and Latin American Culture through Cinema (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed to give students the opportunity to examine and appreciate the rich and diverse cultures of Spain, Latin America and Latinos in the United States through films, videos and selected readings, as well as to improve their formal knowledge of the language. The course will combine lecture, film viewing and discussion in each class. Prerequisite: MLSP 235.

    • MLSP 307 Spanish for Business (3:3:0)
      • This course provides students who have at least intermediate-level Spanish fluency the opportunity to deepen their language skills via focused study of the business environments of Latin America, Spain and the U.S. Latino communities. Students will practice essential business vocabulary; engage in situational conversation for various commercial sectors; write effective business documents; and learn to communicate appropriately in cross-cultural business settings. Prerequisite: MLSP 117 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 310 A Critical Approach to Spanish Literature (3:3:0)
      • This is a course designed to acquaint Spanish students, advancing from skill courses in communication to liberated reading, with basic elements of literary appreciation and methods of literary evaluation. Prerequisite: MLSP 221.

    • MLSP 315 Spanish Grammar and Composition (3:3:0)
      • This course is a thorough and systematic survey of Spanish grammar. Composition themes will be based on important phases of Spanish life and culture. Prerequisite: MLSP 215 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 336 Spanish Oral Practice (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed to help the student attain fluency in Spanish. It includes the presentation, discussion, and criticism of timed oral reports on a wide variety of subjects, as well as one-to-one student-teacher conferences and individual sessions in the language laboratory. This class is limited to 12 students and is offered on demand. Prerequisite: MLSP 235.

    • MLSP 401 Readings in Spanish Literature (3:3:0)
      • Students undertake analytical readings of selected works of Spanish literature and engage in critical discussions of them. The course proceeds chronologically, beginning with a short introduction to the Latin roots of Castilian, and providing historical context for subsequent literary movements and writers as they are taken up. Each student will also engage in more focused research and writing on some aspects of the course material covered. Prerequisites: MLSP 310, 315 or 4 years of high school Spanish.

    • MLSP 402 Readings in Spanish-American Literature (3:3:0)
      • Students undertake analytical readings of selected works of Spanish-American literature and engage in critical discussions of them. The course proceeds chronologically, beginning with a short introduction to indigenous literary compositions, and providing historical context for subsequent Spanish-language movements and writers as they are taken up. Each student will also engage in more focused research and writing on some aspect of the course material covered. Prerequisites: MLSP 215, 310 or 4 years of high school Spanish.

    • MLSP 410 Caribbean Literature and Culture (3:3:0)
      • This course examines the literary and social traditions of the Spanish-speaking Caribbean (Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico) within the context of the Caribbean basin. Emphasis is given to the major literary and social works from the Colonial period to the present. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites for undergraduates: MLSP 310 and one of the following courses: MLSP 401, 402, 444, or 445.

    • MLSP 416 Spanish Language for Native Speakers (3:3:0)
      • This course is designed for native speakers of Spanish who want to improve their formal knowledge of the language. At the undergraduate level it is to be taken in place of MLSP 315 (Spanish Grammar and Composition). Admissions will be determined by Spanish faculty. Prerequisites: Native-speaking ability as determined by the Department and MLSP 310 and 336.

    • MLSP 421 Spanish Golden Age Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course includes reading and analysis of key literary works of the Spanish Golden Age, with contextual study of medieval and humanist influences upon authors of that period. Prerequisites: MLSP 310, 315.

    • MLSP 423 Mexican Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course is an intensive study of prose literature which has appeared in Mexico since the Revolution. Reading and discussion of major works by Paz, Rulfo, Azuela, Yanez, Fuentes, and Ruben Romero are included. This course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLSP 310.

    • MLSP 425 Latin American Short Story (3:3:0)
      • This course examines the development of the modern short story in Latin America from its nineteenth-century roots through several twentieth-century phases and into its present forms. Relevant theory and sociocultural context will accompany the study of this literature. Taught in Spanish.

        Prerequisites: MLSP 310 and one of the following survey courses: MLSP 402, 444, 445.

    • MLSP 426 Twentieth Century Spanish Drama (3:3:0)
      • This course is a study of the modern drama including the works of Frederico Garcia Lorca and Alejandro Casona, as well as Post-War dramatists. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLSP 310.

    • MLSP 427 The Representative Latin American Novel (3:3:0)
      • This course involves reading and analyzing significant Latin American novels which reflect social, political, intellectual, and cultural developments from the colonial period to the present. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLSP 310.

    • MLSP 428 Twentieth Century Spanish Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course is an in-depth study of representative works of prose and poetry from the generation of 1898 to the present. The course is offered on demand. Prerequisites: MLSP 310.

    • MLSP 430 Modernismo: Prose and Poetry (3:3:0)
      • This course is a study of the writings of the key figures of the Modernismo movement in Latin America and their impact on Hispanic literature in Europe and the Americas. The scope is multinational, and it includes the various generations that constitute this movement. This course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: MLSP 310 or 4 years of high school Spanish, MLSP 315.

    • MLSP 435 Afro-Latin American Literature (3:3:0)
      • This course examines the literature and cultural context of peoples of African descent in Latin American societies from the end of the colonial period to the present day. Through critical readings of literary texts by and about Afro-Latin Americans, with supplementary historical documentation and film, students explore the experiences of members of this group and learn how they have been represented in Latin America. Prerequisites: MLSP 310 or equivalent or one of the advanced language courses or a language proficiency course (EDC).

    • MLSP 440 Women and Society in the Literature of Spain and Latin America (3:3:0)
      • This course guides students through an analysis of the representation of female characters in the literature of Spain and Latin America from the sixteenth century to the present. The selected literature will be examined for its aesthetics, for its function within society and for the questions raised by it throughout history. Accompanying the literary readings will be contextual study that highlights the evolution of women's roles in society. Taught in Spanish. For undergraduate students the prerequisites: MLSP 310 and one of the following survey courses: MLSP 401, 402, 444, or 445.

    • MLSP 444 Cultural History of Spain (3:3:0)
      • This course consists of selected readings and directed discussion on the cultural history of Spain from the pre Roman era to today. Cultural artifacts to be studied include literature, visual art, music and key historical documents. Each student will also engage in more focused research and writing on some aspect of the course material covered. Prerequisites: MLSP 215, 221 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 445 Cultural History of Latin America (3:3:0)
      • This course consists of selected readings and directed discussion on the cultural history of Latin America from the pre-contact era to today. Cultural artifacts to be studied include literature, visual art, music and key historical documents. Each student will also engage in more focused research and writing on some aspect of the course material covered. Prerequisites: MLSP 215, 221 or equivalent.

    • MLSP 450 U.S. Latino Literature and Culture (3:3:0)
      • This interdisciplinary course explores the presence, culture, literature and history of the Latino population in the US, through literary texts, film, media, newspapers and other cultural production. This course is offered in Spanish. Prerequisite: MLSP 215, 310 or their equivalents.

    • MLSP 485 Independent Study (semester hours to be arranged)
    • MLSP 495 Seminar (3:3:0)
      • This advanced level course will cover varied topics in Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. Students will write a research paper and present an oral report. (In addition to presenting an in-depth oral report, graduate students will be required to submit a 15-page research paper in strict compliance with MLA guidelines, which must include at least three documented sources). Prerequisites: MLSP 310 and one additional 300/400 level class.