Political Science, M.A., M.Ed.

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College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Political Science / Stroud Hall 409

570-422-3286

www.esu.edu/pols

Faculty

Graduate Coordinator:

Ko Mishima, Ph.D., kmishima@po-box.esu.edu

Professor:

Kenneth Mash, Ph.D., kmash@po-box.esu.edu

Samuel Quainoo, Ph.D., squainoo@po-box.esu.edu

Associate Professors:

Kimberly Adams, Ph.D., kadams@po-box.esu.edu

Leif Johan Eliasson, Ph.D., jeliasson@po-box.esu.edu

Jeffrey Weber, Ph.D., jweber@po-box.esu.edu

Assistant Professors:

Adam McGlynn, Ph.D., amcglynn@po-box.esu.edu

Ko Mishima, Ph.D., kmishima@po-box.edu.edu

Sara Reed, Ph.D., sreed@po-box.esu.edu

Master of Arts in Political Science

  • 30 credits

    Purpose of degree:

    This degree allows students to work in the public, non-profit, or private sector at various levels — domestic, foreign, or international. The political science curriculum comprises the systematic study of the theory and practice of politics at various levels — domestic, foreign, and international.

    Depending on their interests, students can focus on questions of a theoretical nature, the role and performance of political institutions and political systems, or the behavior of individuals and groups.

    Our political science degree prepares students to work in both the public and private sectors. Many majors also use this preparation as a basis for further study both in graduate school and law school.

    Outcome expectations of students and degree completion:

    To understand the basic research methodologies used in the discipline, develop a research problem which is theoretically and conceptually sound, and execute an acceptable Master's Thesis.

    Special resources of the department:

    The department provides internship opportunities for students who are interested in exploring employment in the public or private sectors.

    Program of Study

    Required classes

    POLS 570

    Introduction to Research

    3 credits

    POLS 572

    Thesis I

    3 credits

    POLS 573

    Thesis II

    3 credits

    Political Science Electives

    15-21 semester hours (minimum).

    Students must elect at least one course from each group:

    • Group A - American Politics and Public Administration
    • Group B - International Relations
    • Group C - Comparative Government and Regional Studies
    • Group D - Political Theory

    Related Electives.

    Students may select up to six semester hours from related areas:history, economics, sociology, geography, or other courses by permission of the chairperson of the degree faculty.

    Language requirement

    A knowledge of the fundamentals of one foreign language is required unless waived under the provisions set forth in the Graduate Catalog.

    Final graduation requirement

    Successfully complete the research methods course, satisfactorily pass a comprehensive exam and complete an acceptable Masters Thesis.

    Admissions requirements and deadlines

    The department follows the requirements of the Graduate College for admission.

Master of Education in Political Science: Thesis Program

  • 30 credits

    Purpose of degree:

    This degree allows students who are presently teaching to obtain further credentials in their field or to begin taking classes they can use toward certification.

    Outcome expectations of students and degree completion:

    To understand the basic research methodologies used in the discipline, develop a research problem which is theoretically and conceptually sound, and execute an acceptable Master's Thesis.

    Program of Study

    Required classes

    POLS 570

    Introduction to Research

    3 credits

    POLS 572

    Thesis I

    3 credits

    Political Science Electives

    12-18 semester hours (minimum). Students must elect at least one course from each group:

    • Group A - American Politics and Public Administration;
    • Group B - International Relations
    • Group C - Comparative Government and Regional Studies
    • Group D - Political Theory.

    Related Electives

    Up to 6 semester hours may be taken in related fields.

    General and Professional Education – 6 semester hours.

    Final graduation requirement

    Successfully complete the research methods course, satisfactorily pass a comprehensive exam and complete an acceptable Masters Thesis.

    Admissions requirements and deadlines

    The department follows the requirements of the Graduate College for admission.

Master of Education in Political Science: Non-Thesis Program

  • 34 credits

    Purpose of degree:

    This degree allows students who are presently teaching to obtain further credentials in their field or to begin taking classes they can use toward certification.

    Outcome expectations of students and degree completion:

    To understand the basic research methodologies used in the discipline, develop a research problem which is theoretically and conceptually sound, and complete an acceptable Independent Research Project.

    Program of Study

    Required classes

    POLS 570

    Introduction to Research

    3 credits

    POLS 571

    Independent Research Problem

    1 credit

    Political Science Electives

    12-18 semester hours (minimum). Students must elect at least one course from each group:

    • Group A - American Politics and Public Administration
    • Group B - International Relations
    • Group C - Comparative Government and Regional Studies
    • Group D - Political Theory

    Related Electives.

    Up to nine semester hours may be taken in related fields.

    General and Professional Education, nine semester hours.

    Final graduation requirement

    Successfully complete the research methods course, satisfactorily pass a comprehensive exam and complete an acceptable Independent Research Project.

    Admissions requirements and deadlines

    The department follows the requirements of the Graduate College for admission.

    Graduate Assistantships:

    Graduate assistantships are available through the department. These are awarded based upon merit and achievement to full-time students in the graduate program. Graduate assistants do not teach classes, but complete projects and tasks assigned by professors.

    The graduate assistantship is awarded for the first year of full-time study, with the possibility of extension through the first summer. Prospective students should apply for a graduate assistantship at the time of original application to the program, using the application form provided by the Graduate School or apply online.

Course Descriptions

  • POLS 501 Public Administration: Theory, Scope, and Methods (3)

    • Public Administration: Theory, Scope and Methods is an introductory course concerned with American government planning, organizing, and operation necessary for governance on the national, state, and local levels. This course provides the student with a graduate level overview of: the historical foundations of public administration; the nature of governmental activity; governmental structure, bureaucracy, and organizational theory; public personnel management; public budgeting and financial management; administrative law; and administrative ethics.

  • POLS 514 Seminar on Local Government (3)

    • This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to examine the operation and concerns of local government in detail. The focus will be on the challenges caused by rapid population growth and economic development. Students will examine the juxtaposition of local government in the American system, the adequacy of local government structures, land-use policy, taxing practices, and environmental and social issues. There will be interaction with local government officials.

  • POLS 516 Administrative Law (3)

    • Administrative Law is concerned with the administrative agencies. It studies the powers of agencies, the limits on their powers, the rules that bind agency actions, and the remedies available to those injured by administrative power. For the purpose of this course, administrative law is the law governing the creation of, powers of, and limitations upon public bureaucracies, not the regulations they produce.

  • POLS 518 Political Communication (3)

    • This course explores the role of the news media in both domestic and international politics. This course is designed to be accessible to both Political Science and Communications students. An emphasis is place upon recent research and the exploration of current topics in this area.

  • POLS 520 Area Studies I (3)

    • (A specific area will be announced). This course investigates selected problems of historical and political development in major world areas. Emphasis is placed on political institutions-their background, development and significance.

  • POLS 522 Seminar: Foreign Travel and Study (3) or (6)

    • This course involves travel and possibly study at foreign colleges and universities. The focus will be the history and government of the countries visited, and their economic growth and integration. Emphasis is placed on formal and informal discussion and analysis of contemporary indigenous problems.

  • POLS 523 Seminar in American Public Policy (3)

    • In this course students will analyze the competing proposals and contemporary research addressing the major public policy issues affecting the United States today. Students will be required to critically analyze and debate the course readings with an eye towards identifying the best policies to adopt. Policy topics to be covered in the course include: education, the environment, immigration, entitlement programs, and health care reform. The topics covered will change based on the significant policy issues being addressed by policymakers at the time course is offered.

  • POLS 525 Seminar: The Middle East (3)

    • This course will offer an advanced study and analysis of selected Middle East states. Emphasis will focus on political culture, modernization efforts and nationalism both in terms of regional identity and in terms of its broader international consequences.

  • POLS 528 Comparative Policy Analysis (3)

    • This seminar concentrates on the theory, techniques, and content of a body of research broadly concerned with factors that determine the variation in patterns of public policy across jurisdictions and over time. Students read materials that focus on how cultures, economic systems, and political institutions differ and how these differences affect public policies.

  • POLS 529 International Political Economy (3)

    • International political economy (IPE) is concerned with the mutual interactions of political decisions and economic transactions, the so-called market place, in the modern world. This course provides an overview of how political, social, and economic actors and events, domestic and international, public as well as private, shape policies and economic developments. It also covers research methods and theories of international political economy, and asks participants to assess current developments using these theories and methods. We probe why certain policies are adopted and how they affect the economies of major industrialized and developing nation-states.

  • POLS 531 Contemporary Political Thought (3)

    • This course is a study of Twentieth Century thought concerning the role of the state in society. It includes discussion of ethical as well as pragmatic considerations, analysis and appraisal of liberalism, conservatism, fascism, socialism, communitarianism, multi-culturalism, feminism, and other ideologies. Political structures and functions are considered in connection with social values and objectives.

  • POLS 532 Seminar in Parties and Politics (3)

    • This course analyzes political parties as a part of the political process, political parties as an integral force in society, the transformation of societal values into public policy through the operation of the party system, electoral systems and their relationship to the political system, voting behavior, changing styles in party strategy, campaigning, and suggestions for electoral reform.

  • POLS 533 The Presidency (3)

    • This course is an analysis of the presidency; its nature in both its personal and institutional dimensions; the growth of the office; the politics and problems of seeking the office of the presidency; the President's roles as chief executive, party leader, legislative leader, and leader in the international political system. Since this course is also offered for undergraduate credit, differentiation of course requirements may be made.

  • POLS 534 Seminar: Presidential Elections and Politics (3)

    • This course is a study of the presidential elections of unusual significance in U.S. history; pre-election politics, partisan maneuvers, the platform and selection of candidates; examination of the campaign and election process; discernment of distinguishing characteristics as well as common patterns; evaluation and comparison of results and future applicability.

  • POLS 535 Inter-governmental Relations (3)

    • This course examines the distribution of powers between the Federal government and the states. It includes a review of the historic development of American Federalism, as well as current trends, major areas of conflict and cooperation and case studies of significant problems. Emphasis in the course is placed on evaluating the administrative processes that bind federal, state, and local governments together.

  • POLS 536 Seminar: Readings in Civil Liberties (3)

    • Attention is given to changed conditions and new influences affecting American liberty in the twentieth century. It includes an analysis of issues in economic, social, and political liberties. Emphasis is on constitutional logic and change and on evaluation of the role of the state and the responsibility of the citizen in defining civil liberties. Selections of issues are adapted to student interest and timeliness of problems.

  • POLS 537 Problems in Public Administration (3)

    • This course is a survey and analysis of the major contributions in traditional and contemporary organization theory; examination of decision making, leadership, and human behavior in complex organization; the study of Public Administration as an integral part of the public policy process; problems in budgetary politics; and personnel administration, administrative law, and democracy in the administrative state.

  • POLS 538 United States Foreign Policy (3)

    • This course examines the Constitutional basis of U.S. foreign affairs, foreign policy, separation of powers, the mechanics of foreign relations, significant principles, tenets and trends as revealed in United States diplomatic history, treaties and executive agreements, traditional and new diplomatic practices, foreign policy and international organization, and the extent of democratic control of foreign affairs.

  • POLS 540 Comparative Politics (3)

    • This course consists of a comparative analysis of Western European political systems with special emphasis upon the environmental factors that have shaped these systems and the identification of relevant categories, such as ideology and the organization of political authority, from which generalizations may be derived.

  • POLS 541 Seminar on International Security (3)

    • Placed in the context of globalization, this course investigates new security threats to states and people globally. The course looks at contemporary international debates on social and political sources of violent acts, international and domestic laws on terrorism and counter-terrorism, the balance of security versus individual rights, and organizations involved in security issues.

  • POLS 543 The United Nations (3)

    • This course investigates the establishment, operation and responsibilities of the United Nations, its organs, agencies, and commissions; the development of the Charter since its inception and analysis of its emerging structure; the problems of increasing membership; the strengths and weaknesses of the Charter, the evaluation of U.N. successes and failures; and the prospects for the future.

  • POLS 544 International Relations: Theory and Practice (3)

    • This course examines the theories, public and private organizations, and individual positions used to explain international interactions between nations. National interests, foreign policy and the changing international order are examined using dominant theories to gain an understanding of international decision making and events.

  • POLS 545 International Law and Organization (3)

    • This course is a study of rules that govern sovereign states in their legal relations with each other as well as the historic development and current status of the law of nations. Key cases are studied to illustrate rules. The course includes a survey of the development of international institutions from the 19th century public unions to the more recent specialized agencies, procedures for settlement of disputes, development of law in and outside the community of nations, and the study of international organizations as a political phenomenon of the 20th century.

  • POLS 547 Seminar in American Political Thought (3)

    • An in-depth exposure to major segments of American political thought, with a special emphasis on the emergence of Liberalism. This evolution would be considered in successive courses, as determined by the professor. A possible breakdown might be as follows; relevant English, revolutionary, Constitutional and Whig thought; transcendentalism, the Civil War and individualism, pragmatism; New Deal Liberals and other recent writings.

  • POLS 548 The Politics of Developing Nations (3)

    • This course is a comparative analysis of political development in the Third World with particular focus upon the role of revolutionary warfare and politics, charismatic leaders, military elites and ideology.

  • POLS 550 Seminar in International Studies (3)

    • This course consists of studies of international dimensions of human experience. It includes an investigation of various aspects of human interactions with emphasis on political, economic, philosophical, educational, and other areas. The approach is interdisciplinary and includes projects and practical experiences. Students may receive credit in political science or in other fields in which they complete projects with permission of cooperating departments.

  • POLS 554 The Legislative Process (3)

    • This course concentrates on the United States Congress, its role in the evolution of the American political process, the internal workings of the Congress, the environment in which Congress functions, and an assessment of Congressional effectiveness.

  • POLS 562 Political Behavior (3)

    • This course is an examination of the formation and causes of cleavages and consensus in the American political system; the study of political attitude formation and political partisanship, and how these phenomena affect voting behavior and political activism. Students will have an opportunity to develop simple statistical skills and apply statistical analysis to survey research data using SPSS.

  • POLS 566 Public Budgeting and Finance (3)

    • This course treats budget as a policy instrument that sets priorities for government. Students study the politics of the budget process as well as its procedures. Attention is also given to fiscal and monetary policies and to using computer simulations in budgeting. This course provides graduates with an overview of the budgeting process from revenue sources to expenditure controls. Special emphasis is placed on systematic budgeting techniques such as ZBB and MBO. It requires each student to become acquainted with accounting techniques used in public agencies.

  • POLS 567 Public Personnel Administration (3)

    • The course explores the policies, programs, and techniques used in managing human resources in the public and non-profit sectors. It addresses issues of personnel leadership, neutrality, and accountability. It includes challenges resulting from legislation, collective bargaining, and changing demographics in the workforce.

  • POLS 570 Introduction to Research: Scope and Method (3)

    • This course is an orientation to graduate study and research. This seminar is designed to acquaint the graduate student with the methods and materials of graduate study and scientific inquiry in Political Science. The course is required of all graduate students in the degree programs.

  • POLS 571 Independent Research Problem (Semester Hours Arranged)

    • This course utilizes selected social science research techniques to attack a specific problem. A formal report is prepared and presented. The course is required for all students in the non-thesis program. Requires prior or concurrent completion of POLS 570.

  • POLS 572 Thesis I (3)

    • Under the direction of a thesis adviser, this course consists of the development of a thesis topic, gathering data, organization of material, evaluation of data, and writing a formal thesis report.

  • POLS 573 Thesis II (3)

  • POLS 577 Independent Study in Political Science (Semester Hours Arranged)

    • Under the auspices of a qualified member of the departmental faculty, the student pursues a pattern of reading, study, and research related to professional knowledge and understanding in political science. Topics should be established prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Departmental approval; permission of the chairperson of the department.

  • POLS 586 Field Experience and Internship (Semester Hours Arranged)

    • This course is designed to provide the student with practical experience in a governmental agency or other organization with local, state, or national governmental or political concerns. Prerequisite: A minimum of 6 s.h. completed on the graduate level in political science with at least a "B" average. The student must be enrolled in the department graduate program.