English

English

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College of Arts and Sciences

Department of English

Stroud Hall 309

570-422-3398

www.esu.edu/english

The English Department continues to offer graduate coursework in support of certification and Masters of Education programs, in conjunction with other requirements of the Department of Professional and Secondary Education. Those graduate courses in English are geared toward new and continuing teachers in the middle and high school levels. Commencing in 2014, the English Department will offer a new M.A. degree in Professional and New Media Writing. Most of the M.A. coursework will be taught online and in the evenings, making the program convenient for the employed graduate student. The program does require some occasional and brief on-campus credit experiences, since a low-residency program helps to build professional network relationships.

The M.A. in Professional and New Media Writing is designed to give the future professional writer strong background in professional research, organizational writing, document conceptualization, and editing. Course electives permit the student the opportunity to learn about various genres in professional writing, such as journalism and corporate writing.

Master of Arts in Professional and New Media Writing

  • Required courses

    ENGL 501

    Seminar in Professional Writing Styles and Approaches

    3

    ENGL 510

    Introduction to Professional Writing Research Methods

    3

    ENGL 514

    Advanced Grammar and Copyediting

    3

    ENGL 520

    The Professional Document

    3

    ENGL 590

    Thesis in Professional and New Media Writing

    3

    15 additional credits from :

     

    ENGL 530

    Theory and Craft of Writing

    3

    ENGL 531

    Professional Writing for the Web

    3

    ENGL 532

    Public Relations and Organizational Writing

    3

    ENGL 533

    Professional Writing About Places

    3

    ENGL 534

    Visual Rhetoric

    3

    ENGL 536

    Administrative and Technical Writing

    3

    ENGL 540

    Theories of Electronic Writing

    3

    ENGL 541

    Studies in Journalistic Literature

    3

    ENGL 542

    Currents in American Journalism

    3

Course Descriptions

  • ENGL 501 Seminar in Professional Writing Styles and Approaches (3:3:0)

    • In this course students will explore and evaluate the range of professional writing rhetoric, rhetorical styles, and genres from a scholarly and critical perspective. In addition students will meet peers and professors in informal settings, attend guest lectures and participate in discussions facilitated by nationally significant authors, editors, agents, vision-makers, and publishing entrepreneurs from the New York City / Philadelphia metroplexes in the fields of advertising, journalism, public relations, technical communication, and creative writing. Prerequisite: Open to graduate students in the English M.A. in Professional and New Media Writing.

  • ENGL 503 Shakespeare: Advanced Studies (3:3:0)

    • This course is intended to enhance the student’s knowledge of comedies, tragedies, and histories of Shakespeare besides those taught and retaught in our schools. Students will also study recent Shakespearean criticism.

  • ENGL 510 Introduction to Professional Writing Research Methods (3:3:0)

    • This course combines an introduction to traditional academic research, historiography, source-review, and archival analysis practices with the appraisal of and practice in using some of the cutting-edge, technology-driven methods of research (data-mining, crowdsourcing, online research tools, etc.) employed by professional writers working in senior-level and/or advanced corporate, governmental, and non-profit contexts.

  • ENGL 512 Teaching of Writing in the Secondary and Middle Schools (3:3:0)

    • This course will briefly survey the history of the teaching of writing in American secondary schools, intensively review writing process theory and research of the past two decades, and critically consider the implications of writing process theory and research for classroom practice. Also listed as PSED 512. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

  • ENGL 513 Seminar in Writing Pedagogy and Instructional Practices (6:6:0)

    • This is an intensive four-week summer course for teachers of all disciplines and grade levels that focuses on three related activities: (1) teacher demonstrations of classroom practice; (2) study of current theory and research in writing, thinking, diversity, and teaching; and (3) practice in writing and responding. Prerequisites: B.A. or B.S. in any academic discipline and consent of instructor.

  • ENGL 514 Advanced Grammar and Copyediting (3:3:0)

    • This course will prepare writers to make informed decisions about grammar, usage, style, and punctuation in professional manuscripts. Following a review of the concepts and terminology specific to the field, the course will include practice in writing and proofreading both on-line and paper texts designed for a variety of publications, as the requirements vary from one medium and genre to another.

  • ENGL 515 Computers and Writing (3:3:0)

    • Computers and Writing will examine the impact that the new forms of electronic writing have had and will have on conventional print-based writing. We will analyze various forms of electronic writing such as the World Wide Web, e-mail, listservs, newsgroups, and MOOs.

  • ENGL 520 The Professional Document (3:3:0)

    • This course focuses on current editorial document production in order to prepare students for editorial jobs in news, magazine, and online media. Workplace writing production and the effective combined use of written text and image in a variety of formats, including brochures, magazine layouts, book design, web pages, PowerPoints, instructional texts, and advertisements will be discussed. Students will use industry standard tools and techniques associated to current editorial processes.

  • ENGL 530 Theory and Craft of Writing (3:3:0)

    • This course focuses on the theory and craft of writing in one of the following genres: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, journalism, screenwriting, web-based writing, public relations writing, advertising, etc. Emphasis will be on the historical and theoretical underpinnings of craft as they apply to the particular genre or mode of discourse.

  • ENGL 531 Professional Writing for the Web (3:3:0)

    • This course will focus on web writing, design and site-evaluation and provide students with opportunities to carry out a range of sophisticated web-based writing projects for regional non-profits, from creating entire websites to writing select content or revamping existing websites. The course assumes no prior knowledge of programming languages, but all students within the first month will be expected to gain a working knowledge in HTML, XML, and CSS languages, as well as knowledge of scripting languages.

  • ENGL 532 Public Relations and Organizational Writing (3:3:0)

    • This course will focus on case study analyses of current corporate and non-profit public relations and corporate documents. A major emphasis of the course will be on best practices in public relations and corporate writing.

  • ENGL 533 Professional Writing About Places (3:3:0)

    • This course will examine travel writing, travel journalism, public relations initiatives for institutions such as universities, corporations, school districts, living complexes. Emphasis will be placed on creating original documents in various genres.

  • ENGL 534 Visual Rhetoric (3:3:0)

    • This course will cover the history and theory of visual rhetoric and its relationship to print. Students will research, read, analyze, and write about rhetorical images and their social, cultural and political implications. Students will also create visual text for varied rhetorical purposes.

  • ENGL 536 Administrative and Technical Writing (3:3:0)

    • This course focuses on theories and application of administrative and technical writing in print and electronic media. Students will explore the various purposes, genres, styles, and contexts for writing within a corporate, business, government, and/or technical workplace and will create their own administrative and technical documents.

  • ENGL 540 Theories of Electronic Writing (3:3:0)

    • This course will cover the history and theory of electronic writing spaces and how computers, the Web and mobile devices are transforming print based writing. Students will read a wide range of books and articles focused on the evolution and development of the various theories of electronic writing and compose original work in both print and electronic media.

  • ENGL 541 Studies in Journalistic Literature (3:3:0)

    • Students will analyze and engage with a wide variety of literature written by journalists, covering crucial world events and political situations, exploring intersections of journalistic reportage and creative nonfiction.

  • ENGL 542 Currents in American Journalism (3:3:0)

    • This course provides an overview of the history of American journalism in newspaper and magazine writing. The course examines American journalism across several distinct phases: the colonial era; the Revolutionary War and early Republic period; the antebellum and post-Civil War periods; late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century yellow journalism and muckraking; the twentieth-century syndication of the press; and the evolving multimedia age. The course will discuss the interaction between American journalism and the rise of American literature and art.

  • ENGL 554 Topics in British Literature (3:3:0)

    • This graduate course will provide new perspectives for the study of British literature. The new perspectives will include recent critical theories, fresh contexts, and reconceived canons. The emphasis and period(s) considered may vary each semester the course is offered. Students may take this course for credit more than once if they wish to study more than one approach or period.

  • ENGL 562 Topics in American Literature (3:3:0)

    • This graduate course will provide new perspectives for the study of American literature. The new perspectives will include recent critical theories, fresh contexts, and reconceived canons. The emphasis and period(s) considered may vary each semester the course is offered. Students may take this course for credit more than once if they wish to study more than one approach or period.

  • ENGL 563 Studies in Contemporary Literature (3:3:0)

    • This graduate course will consider the major intellectual and aesthetic developments in recent literature. Each semester it is offered, the instructor will choose one particular genre, group of writers, or new literary development to concentrate on for intensive study.

  • ENGL 564 Contemporary Literary Theory for Teachers (3:3:0)

    • This course will consider major developments in recent literary theory and seek to apply them to realistic pedagogical methodology concerning the reading and writing of literature in public schools.

  • ENGL 565 Topics in World Literature (3:3:0)

    • This course is an examination of literature other than British and American, such as African, Asian, Native American, Middle Eastern, Classical, South American, Caribbean, and European. The instructor may choose to examine a particular literary tradition, the literary points of view of a region, a theme running through several literary traditions, or a particular way of reading and responding to a body of literature. Students may take this course for credit more than once if they wish to study more than one tradition or period.

  • ENGL 566 Teaching Multicultural Literature (3:3:0)

    • The English/Education major will utilize a seminar setting to focus on a detailed consideration of current multicultural subject matter, theory, and strategy that may be effective in the multicultural classroom.

  • ENGL 577 Independent Study in English (Semester hours arranged)

    • Under the auspices of a qualified member of the department faculty, the student pursues a pattern of reading, study, and research related to the understanding and knowledge of English.

  • ENGL 590 Thesis in Professional and New Media Writing (3:0:0)

    • Students taking thesis hours develop and complete a written professional, scholarly, and/or artistic capstone project in professional and new media writing in consultation with their thesis committee chairperson. Planned field experiences in professional and/or new media writing may also comprise all or part of this capstone project. Prerequisite: M.A. thesis prospectus approved by thesis committee chairperson.